Marijuana

Gregg Nelson reportedly fails to enjoy beautiful Colorado scenery thanks to pot brownie

The debate about whether the Amendment 64 will help or hurt Colorado tourism rages on -- and the same is true of the controversy over a proposed THC-driving bill that's failed twice but will likely be introduced a third time in the next legislative session. These two topics collide, literally, in the tale of Florida's Gregg Nelson, whose trip to Colorado apparently went sideways due to a pot brownie.

Nelson's story comes to us courtesy of the Boulder Daily Camera, which cites a report from the CU police department.

The cops didn't have to go far to ticket Nelson, age sixty. After all, he was found passed out in the driver's seat of a rental car, with the engine still running, not far from the police station. Reportedly accompanying him were a joint, a lighter and -- DUN! DUN! DUN! -- brownie crumbs. In addition, his car showed damage said to match up with a ding to a nearby bridge on Regent Drive.

Upon being awakened, the report says, Nelson appeared confused -- mumbling, trying to turn off his car by pushing buttons on the dash and repeatedly attempting to remove his seat belt even though he wasn't wearing it any longer.

Next stop? The hospital, where Nelson allegedly said he'd traveled from Florida to Colorado in order to buy medical marijuana for a back injury. He added that he'd ingested said brownie after purchasing it at a dispensary. After that, he planned to visit the mountains, but his yummy prescription put the kibosh on that. He told officers he had no idea how he'd wound up in Boulder.

As a special parting gift, Nelson was handed a citation for suspicion of driving under the influence, which officers managed to bequeath even though no THC-DUI legislation has been signed into law. A true story, and a strange one -- albeit of the sort we may be hearing more often in the months and years to come.

More from our Marijuana archive: "Amendment 64: Marijuana consumers need a seat at the table, says Colorado NORML."

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Michael Roberts has written for Westword since October 1990, serving stints as music editor and media columnist. He currently covers everything from breaking news and politics to sports and stories that defy categorization.
Contact: Michael Roberts