Lists

The Ten Best New Restaurants in Denver in 2017...So Far

Tostada de hoja santa with shrimp escabeche and Argentinian chorizo at Señor Bear.
Tostada de hoja santa with shrimp escabeche and Argentinian chorizo at Señor Bear. Danielle Lirette
We're halfway through 2017, and the variety and quality of new restaurants opening this year has been stellar. As we've tried these new spots, we've sampled our way through Connecticut-style pizza, Mediterranean small plates, Latin American specialties and spicy fried chicken. Here are the ten most promising restaurants of the year so far, in alphabetical order.

click to enlarge French cuisine is in — thanks to Radek Cerny's return to Denver. - MARK ANTONATION
French cuisine is in — thanks to Radek Cerny's return to Denver.
Mark Antonation
Atelier by Radex
2011 East 17th Avenue
720-379-5556
Years have passed since chef/restaurateur Radek Cerny's Denver days, when eateries like Radex and Papillon wowed guests with gastronomic wonders well before the current restaurant boom. Since then, we've had to content ourselves with occasional drives to Boulder for creative French and fusion fare at L'Atelier. But in good news for Denver diners, Cerny brought a new version of his flagship restaurant to East 17th Avenue this year. Francophiles and modernists alike will find something to love on the menu, and Cerny's wine lists are always worth perusing. For something fun, try the Homard "TV Dinner," butter-poached lobster tail served with sides on a compartmentalized platter. But really, anything French, French-ish, French-fusion and French-American is what we love here: Cerny has been doing this for decades, ensuring nary a misstep on the menu.

click to enlarge The chef's counter at Cattivella is the place to dine. Each of the three sides offers a view of different kitchen action. This is also where you'll sit if you sign up for a cooking class from chef/owner Elise Wiggins. - MARK ANTONATION
The chef's counter at Cattivella is the place to dine. Each of the three sides offers a view of different kitchen action. This is also where you'll sit if you sign up for a cooking class from chef/owner Elise Wiggins.
Mark Antonation
Cattivella
10195 East 29th Avenue
303-645-6779
In 2016, Elise Wiggins left her longtime position as executive chef at Panzano to pursue her vision of opening the Italian restaurant she'd always wanted. And with Cattivella (which means "naughty girl"), she's created an eatery that reflects her many experiences traveling, working and eating in Italy. The wood-fired pizza oven is used for far more than just pizzas; even beans are slow-cooked in glass flasks nestled in hot embers. There's also an adjustable wood grill that gives meat (much of it brought in whole and butchered on site) and vegetables a rustic, old-world depth of flavor. Even the housemade breads and pastas separate Cattivella from the standard bistro or trattoria. A small cooler under the counter contains primal cuts of beef dry-aging for weeks for customers who want a little something special in a steak; a gluten-free menu offers pasta and pizza options without sacrificing quality. You're sure to feel spoiled — and even a little naughty — enjoying all types of delights at this unabashedly Italian eatery.

click to enlarge Rippling wood slats form a cavern-like ceiling over the dining room. - DANIELLE LIRETTE
Rippling wood slats form a cavern-like ceiling over the dining room.
Danielle Lirette
Concourse Restaurant Moderne
10195 East 29th Drive
720-550-6934
Concourse opened in the new Eastbridge Stapleton development at the beginning of May, bringing chef/restaurateur Lon Symensma's elegant and worldly vision to life in a neighborhood hungry for new dining options. As a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, Symensma's roots are in the European cooking tradition, though he has branched out into Asian cuisine during a career that took him to Southeast Asia before he came to Denver. With former classmate Luke Bergman at the helm, Concourse represents a bridge between Symensma's past and future; the menu is dotted with international influences but defies easy categorization. "The one word I wanted it to be is 'sexy,'" the chef explains. We couldn't agree more.

click to enlarge Hummus served inside roasted eggplants. - DANIELLE LIRETTE
Hummus served inside roasted eggplants.
Danielle Lirette
El Five
2930 Umatilla Street
303-524-9193
Chef/restaurateur Justin Cucci doesn't do subtle. From the "gastro-brothel" excess of Ophelia's Electric Soapbox to the reclaimed mortuary mishmash of Linger, Cucci's restaurants turn unlikely spaces into full-on barrages of all of the senses. His newest, which opened in early May, is no exception, converting the fifth floor of a new LoHi office building into a riotous trans-Mediterranean tapas bar bedecked in vintage Arabic movie posters and glam finishes. Cucci's Edible Beats restaurant group also includes Root Down and Vital Root, so El Five is the "fifth story" in the family, Cucci notes. The name is also a nod to its location and its menu, with half of the roster devoted to tapas-inspired plates, even if Spain is only one of Cucci's influences. Like the decor, the menu is an explosion of Moroccan, Israeli and Turkish flavors, in addition to more recognizable ports-of-call.

click to enlarge Il Posto's octopus carpaccio is lovely to look at — and a delight to eat. - DANIELLE LIRETTE
Il Posto's octopus carpaccio is lovely to look at — and a delight to eat.
Danielle Lirette
Il Posto
2601 Larimer Street
303-394-0100
Il Posto is a familiar name to Denver diners, but when Andrea Frizzi moved his Italian restaurant from its cubby on East 17th Avenue to a sleek bi-level cube in RiNo, it was more than a relocation — it was a reinvention of the ten-year-old eatery. But is the new address a good home for this restaurant's semi-chaotic charm? We needn't have worried. Il Posto 2.0 presents some of the team's best cooking yet, from new meditations on its always-stellar risotti to a masterful pappardelle with pork ragu to a showy and delicious beef tallow candle (impossible at the old address, says Frizzi, because there just wasn't enough space to make candles). Despite its more grown-up vibe, this space is infused with the old Il Posto magic: Frizzi bobs around frenetically kissing the cheeks of friends and strangers alike, wine from an expertly curated list pours freely and easily, and the energy of the kitchen spills out from an open window beneath giant Scrabble tiles that spell out changing messages to guests. As a bonus, Il Posto now has one of the best tables in Denver, a second-level corner seat that looks out on the Denver skyline.


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