Best of Denver

The Fifteen Best New Restaurants of 2017

Señor Bear's tostada de hoja santa helped earn the restaurant a place on our list of the best new restaurants of 2017.
Señor Bear's tostada de hoja santa helped earn the restaurant a place on our list of the best new restaurants of 2017. Danielle Lirette
Denver has grown as quickly as the summer thunderstorms that burst over the Front Range, inspiring fear and awe as they billow higher and higher into the afternoon skies. Exploding growth has brought unsightly architecture, inconvenient traffic snarls and social upheaval. But the plus side has been an infusion of new blood, new creativity and great new restaurants. The variety and quality of the dining scene has never been better, thanks to both longtime industry veterans reinventing themselves and newcomers adding flavors from other regions. Here are the fifteen best new restaurants to open so far in 2017; we'll finalize the list at the start of the new year, giving December latecomers a chance to prove their worth, too.

click to enlarge Heads or tails: Either way, you win at Annette. - DANIELLE LIRETTE
Heads or tails: Either way, you win at Annette.
Danielle Lirette
Annette
2501 Dallas Street, Aurora
720-710-9175
Located in Stanley Marketplace, Annette is a beautiful restaurant. Flooded with light, the contemporary space is dotted with natural touches – planters with live trees, live plants on every table — that make the room feel sophisticated, not stark. While the restaurant pushes boundaries with its small-plates menu — think beef tongue and marrow toast — it follows in the footsteps of many small-plates eateries that anchor our dining scene, not least of which is Acorn, where chef-owner Caroline Glover previously worked. Sodas are made in-house and come in flavors such as rosemary and lemongrass-herb. Seasonal ingredients are revered; pickled accents pop up everywhere. A wood-fired grill adds a cozy rusticity that you smell when you walk in the door. The restaurant is at its best when showcasing Glover’s take on comfort food: pillowy gnocchi, whole fish with seasonal sauces, grilled carrots and snap peas, and housemade ice cream sandwiches.

click to enlarge Radek Cerny has a way with shellfish at Atelier. - MARK ANTONATION
Radek Cerny has a way with shellfish at Atelier.
Mark Antonation
Atelier by Radex
2011 East 17th Avenue
720-379-5556
Years have passed since chef/restaurateur Radek Cerny's Denver days, when eateries like Radex and Papillon wowed guests with gastronomic wonders well before the current restaurant boom. Since then, we've had to content ourselves with occasional drives to Boulder for creative French and fusion fare at L'Atelier. But then Cerny brought a new version of his flagship restaurant to the former home of Il Posto in Uptown in May. Francophiles and modernists alike will find something to love on the new menu, and Cerny's wine lists are always worth perusing. For something fun, try the Homard "TV Dinner," butter-poached lobster tail served with sides on a compartmentalized platter. But really, anything French, French-ish, French-fusion and French-American is what we love here; Cerny has been doing this for decades, ensuring nary a misstep on the menu.

click to enlarge At the Bindery, a traditional English dish called Welsh rarebit  turns into rabbit rarebit, which also includes smoked pecans. - MARK ANTONATION
At the Bindery, a traditional English dish called Welsh rarebit turns into rabbit rarebit, which also includes smoked pecans.
Mark Antonation
The Bindery
1817 Central Street
303-993-2364

Chef Linda Hampsten Fox's new market restaurant opened in October with breakfast, lunch, dinner and a pastry case filled with housemade breads and confections. Fox is a world traveler and caterer who apprenticed under chefs in Italy, France and Switzerland and operated her own farm in Tuscany; the Bindery is the culmination of a career flavored by all those gigs, as well as Fox's time living in Mexico, Boulder and New Jersey (where she grew up in a Czech-Polish family). While her cooking style defies easy definition, hints of all of the above influences can be found in nearly every dish. On the dinner menu, for example, there's a ravioli called cansuzei from Cortina, Italy (near the border with Austria), that's stuffed with braised radicchio and bathed in a buttery poppyseed broth. But there are also braised beef cheeks flavored with guajillo and ancho chiles, and octopus swimming in a zingy aguachile sauce enriched with charred tortillas, both influenced by her time in Baja California. And a rabbit rarebit combines a rustic Welsh dish of cheese and toast with a European sensibility for alternative proteins. Whether popping in for a morning coffee or indulging in a romantic evening out, you'll find creativity, variety and passion in every bite.


click to enlarge "El Gran Combo" guacamole with guajillo-pistachio mojo, orange and plantain chips at Candela Latin Kitchen. - MARK ANTONATION
"El Gran Combo" guacamole with guajillo-pistachio mojo, orange and plantain chips at Candela Latin Kitchen.
Mark Antonation
Candela Latin Kitchen
1691 Central Street
303-477-4582
Central Bistro & Bar owner Isiah Salazar and chef Jesse Vega converted their breezy bistro into a pan-Latin lounge this past summer, compiling a roster of tacos from Salazar's upbringing and Puerto Rican specialties from Vega's family, along with a few other dishes from Central and South America. The result is a restaurant loaded with intensity and soul, with dishes that leap from the plate with joy while maintaining a heart of pure comfort. Mofongo, the national dish of Puerto Rico, is the star, but bright ceviches, meats drenched in cooked-down sauces and homey empanadas make up a lively accompanying cast. Central Bistro may have been hot, but Candela burns just as bright.

Focaccia di Recco at Cattivella. - DANIELLE LIRETTE
Focaccia di Recco at Cattivella.
Danielle Lirette
Cattivella
10195 East 29th Avenue
303-645-6779
In 2016, Elise Wiggins left her longtime position as executive chef at Panzano to pursue her vision of opening the Italian restaurant she'd always wanted to own. And with Cattivella (which means "naughty girl"), she's created the kind of restaurant that reflects her many experiences from traveling, working and eating in Italy. There's the wood-fired pizza oven used for far more than just pizzas; even beans are slow-cooked in glass flasks nestled in hot embers. There's the adjustable wood grill that gives meats (much of it brought in whole and butchered on site) and vegetables a rustic, old-world depth of flavor. And there are the housemade breads and pastas that separate Cattivella from the standard bistro or trattoria. A small cooler under the counter contains primal cuts of beef dry-aging for weeks for customers who want a little something special in a steak; a gluten-free menu offers housemade pasta and pizza options without sacrificing quality. You're sure to feel spoiled — and even a little naughty — enjoying all types of delights at this unabashedly Italian eatery.

click to enlarge Smoky mezcal and smoked sturgeon pair well at Citizen Rail. - MARK ANTONATION
Smoky mezcal and smoked sturgeon pair well at Citizen Rail.
Mark Antonation
Citizen Rail
1899 16th Street
303-323-0017
Hotel restaurants don't have much of a reputation for inventive, chef-driven fare. But those who have enjoyed meals at Panzano in the Hotel Monaco, less than a mile from Citizen Rail, know that its owner, Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants, isn't content to offer bland tourist fare to please the masses; rather, artisan food production — like the handmade bread and pasta  — is more the norm. That's the case at Citizen Rail in the Hotel Born, too, led by executive chef Christian Graves, who moved to Denver from San Diego, where he was in charge of another Kimpton restaurant. The heart of the restaurant is an open kitchen with several wood-burning grills, where everything from dry-aged steaks to cocktail garnishes is kissed with flame and smoke. But behind the scenes, a larger kitchen holds a butchering room where whole animals are brought in and broken down, providing cuts typical of steakhouse slates but also leaving room for oxtail, lamb sausage, rabbit loin and a decadent burger made from fresh-ground short rib and brisket. Yes, it's a meat-lover's paradise, but it's also so much more.

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