How Denver's Latin Ska Band Roka Hueka Began Writing Its Own History
Karl Christian Krumpholz

How Denver's Latin Ska Band Roka Hueka Began Writing Its Own History

Andrew Gonzalez: “We arrived early, which gave us time to set up the stage — literally. Yes, we hung lights, relocated huge speakers. We didn’t sign anything saying we could, but we did it anyway. At 9 p.m., the first band started. At 10 p.m., 11 p.m., 12 p.m., that first band was still going. ‘Well,’ I thought, ‘I guess we’ll play soon.’ 

How Denver's Latin Ska Band Roka Hueka Began Writing Its Own History
Karl Christian Krumpholz

“Finally at 12:45 a.m., the owner of the bar announced it was our turn. It was time to show everybody what Roka Hueka was all about! The place exploded. A mosh pit formed in the center of the dance floor. Beer was everywhere. People danced, feeling our Latin ska. After more than an hour of music — which was only eight songs into our repertoire — the beginning of Roka Hueka was written, and we’re still writing our history!”

How Denver's Latin Ska Band Roka Hueka Began Writing Its Own History
Karl Christian Krumpholz

Roka Hueka will play at Levitt Pavilion on Friday, August 31.

Editor's Note: The Denver Bootleg is a series chronicling the history of local music venues by longtime Denver cartoonist Karl Christian Krumpholz. Visit Krumpholz's website to see more of his work.

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