Bertha Lynn has been on Denver television long enough to have made a cameo in both the 1980 version of Stephen King's The Shining -- the one starring Jack Nicholson -- and a 1997 TV remake headlined by Steven Weber (apparently the poor man's Jack Nicholson). Still, longevity and experience are only a couple of her noteworthy attributes. She's also got a warm and compassionate on-air approach that's appropriate when talking about subjects both heavy and light. Lynn's an underappreciated Denver original who's definitely ready for her close-up.


At most local stations, elaborate climate-reading gizmos get in the way of the simple, straightforward dissemination of information; watching such weather updates is like trying to figure out if it's going to rain tomorrow by buying a ticket to Laserium. Dave Fraser, on the other hand, is Denver's most direct prognosticator, concentrating on the key aspect of his job -- predicting the freakin' weather -- instead of allowing himself to be overly distracted by fancy screens and flashing colors. If you prefer forecasters who cut to the storm, Fraser's your guy.
At most local stations, elaborate climate-reading gizmos get in the way of the simple, straightforward dissemination of information; watching such weather updates is like trying to figure out if it's going to rain tomorrow by buying a ticket to Laserium. Dave Fraser, on the other hand, is Denver's most direct prognosticator, concentrating on the key aspect of his job -- predicting the freakin' weather -- instead of allowing himself to be overly distracted by fancy screens and flashing colors. If you prefer forecasters who cut to the storm, Fraser's your guy.
Talk is a rare commodity on talk radio these days; it's usually overshadowed by yelling, screaming, one-upmanship and random examples of verbal abuse. But talk still rules on Colorado Matters, which is heard twice daily on KCFR and other stations on the news-talk half of Colorado Public Radio's two-channel network. Dan Drayer, the program's overseer, lets newsmakers, legislators, entertainers and just plain folks speak their piece at a leisurely pace. The show can get a bit sleepy at times, but its drawbacks are balanced by intelligence and a disdain for sound and fury that signify nothing.
Talk is a rare commodity on talk radio these days; it's usually overshadowed by yelling, screaming, one-upmanship and random examples of verbal abuse. But talk still rules on Colorado Matters, which is heard twice daily on KCFR and other stations on the news-talk half of Colorado Public Radio's two-channel network. Dan Drayer, the program's overseer, lets newsmakers, legislators, entertainers and just plain folks speak their piece at a leisurely pace. The show can get a bit sleepy at times, but its drawbacks are balanced by intelligence and a disdain for sound and fury that signify nothing.


A veteran sports columnist at the Denver Post, Jim Armstrong alternates with fellow Post-er Mark Kiszla on The Press Box, a morning-drive show helmed by recent import Tim Neverett. Armstrong doesn't have a typical radio voice, but he's turned out to be an excellent communicator, presenting thoughtful, well-reasoned arguments with a minimum of pomposity or ego and a maximum of humor. A year ago, Armstrong briefly considered ditching sports for news, then reconsidered. His work on 560's morning shift demonstrates that he made the right choice.
A veteran sports columnist at the Denver Post, Jim Armstrong alternates with fellow Post-er Mark Kiszla on The Press Box, a morning-drive show helmed by recent import Tim Neverett. Armstrong doesn't have a typical radio voice, but he's turned out to be an excellent communicator, presenting thoughtful, well-reasoned arguments with a minimum of pomposity or ego and a maximum of humor. A year ago, Armstrong briefly considered ditching sports for news, then reconsidered. His work on 560's morning shift demonstrates that he made the right choice.


Greg Dobbs, who left KNRC earlier this year after an ultra-gross health scare, was a political progressive by Denver talk-radio standards, yet he wasn't a knee-jerk pinko. He was able to eloquently express his opinions even as he equitably refereed debates between people who disagreed with him and individuals supporting his point of view. In other words, he epitomized KNRC's promise to present both sides of issues -- a pledge that's looking awfully one-sided since Dobbs's departure.
Greg Dobbs, who left KNRC earlier this year after an ultra-gross health scare, was a political progressive by Denver talk-radio standards, yet he wasn't a knee-jerk pinko. He was able to eloquently express his opinions even as he equitably refereed debates between people who disagreed with him and individuals supporting his point of view. In other words, he epitomized KNRC's promise to present both sides of issues -- a pledge that's looking awfully one-sided since Dobbs's departure.


He looks like a combination of Santa Claus and Ed Asner, his real identity is kept a mystery, and his on-air shtick is lifted straight from the Wolfman Jack School of deejaying. We don't care: Da Boogieman's funny. He reigns over the airwaves from 7 p.m. to midnight, weeknights on KOOL -- singing along with songs from the oldies canon and cutting up like a kid at the controls. But it isn't just his "Barbara Ann" jokes that get us giggling. It's his voice -- a scratchy, nasal patois of undetermined origin. Is he supposed to sound like a Motor City madman? A rock-and-roll loving Southern boy? A billy goat? Who can say? All we know is that his show is one of the most unabashedly fun features on the dial.

Best Of Denver®

Best Of