Denver Tennis Club
Plenty of new tennis courts have sprung up around the metro area as wealthy residents have pushed into the suburbs. But after a layer of Har-Tru and a chain-link fence, what really distinguishes one place from another? The answer is feel and tradition; after all, Wimbledon without history is just another place for Brits to frolic on the lawn. For this reason, the Denver Tennis Club's dozen courts (two of them clay) get the nod. This past year, the club celebrated its 75th anniversary. Since 1928, the Denver City Open has been held there every year except 1950, when a spat among members temporarily forced the tennis tournament back to City Park. The only downside to the place? No lights -- and the cost of joining has climbed somewhat since the first $5 initiation and $15 annual fees were levied. Today it'll cost you $675 to sign on and $465 per year for membership.
Plenty of new tennis courts have sprung up around the metro area as wealthy residents have pushed into the suburbs. But after a layer of Har-Tru and a chain-link fence, what really distinguishes one place from another? The answer is feel and tradition; after all, Wimbledon without history is just another place for Brits to frolic on the lawn. For this reason, the Denver Tennis Club's dozen courts (two of them clay) get the nod. This past year, the club celebrated its 75th anniversary. Since 1928, the Denver City Open has been held there every year except 1950, when a spat among members temporarily forced the tennis tournament back to City Park. The only downside to the place? No lights -- and the cost of joining has climbed somewhat since the first $5 initiation and $15 annual fees were levied. Today it'll cost you $675 to sign on and $465 per year for membership.
Fossil Trace Golf Course
Let's just agree that any golfing experience is enhanced by the presence of a genuine triceratops footprint etched into the rocks dotted about the course. This summer will mark the first anniversary of the opening of Fossil Trace, the city of Golden's entrance into the lucrative business of civic golf. The public course ($36 per eighteen holes for Golden residents, $41 for Jeffco residents, $46 for everyone else) has garnered numerous awards for its unique setting and use of local features. Most notable: the twenty-foot high sandstone rock formations pocked with fossils that ring the twelfth hole.
Let's just agree that any golfing experience is enhanced by the presence of a genuine triceratops footprint etched into the rocks dotted about the course. This summer will mark the first anniversary of the opening of Fossil Trace, the city of Golden's entrance into the lucrative business of civic golf. The public course ($36 per eighteen holes for Golden residents, $41 for Jeffco residents, $46 for everyone else) has garnered numerous awards for its unique setting and use of local features. Most notable: the twenty-foot high sandstone rock formations pocked with fossils that ring the twelfth hole.


Hate to be obvious, but as the city boasts, the Denver Skatepark is the largest free public skate facility in the nation. With over 50,000 square feet full of planters, curbs, rails and a half-pipe, the park was envisioned and designed as a way to lure away the hordes of young skaters who descended on the 16th Street Mall and other city streets every day looking for a fee-free place to grind. It's lit, so the park is open from 5 a.m. until 11 p.m. every day of the year. Heck, someone else might even cite it at the next HUD gathering: Best Solution to an Urban Problem That Has Actually Worked.
Hate to be obvious, but as the city boasts, the Denver Skatepark is the largest free public skate facility in the nation. With over 50,000 square feet full of planters, curbs, rails and a half-pipe, the park was envisioned and designed as a way to lure away the hordes of young skaters who descended on the 16th Street Mall and other city streets every day looking for a fee-free place to grind. It's lit, so the park is open from 5 a.m. until 11 p.m. every day of the year. Heck, someone else might even cite it at the next HUD gathering: Best Solution to an Urban Problem That Has Actually Worked.


Tired of guiding your old nag around and around the indoor arena? Then ride him like he was meant to be ridden -- hurtling across field and stream alongside a pack of baying hounds in search of a varmint to shred. Most weekends from October to April, as well as on the occasional Wednesday, the Arapahoe Hunt pursues coyotes across a 22,000-acre spread on the site of the old Lowry bombing range. Now in its 75th year, the hunt is one of the oldest in the West. It was started in 1907, took a short break during World War I, but resumed coyote-terrorizing operations in 1929 and has been going full gallop ever since. Anyone with a horse can join in the fun, as long as he's willing to ride well and follow local customs.
Tired of guiding your old nag around and around the indoor arena? Then ride him like he was meant to be ridden -- hurtling across field and stream alongside a pack of baying hounds in search of a varmint to shred. Most weekends from October to April, as well as on the occasional Wednesday, the Arapahoe Hunt pursues coyotes across a 22,000-acre spread on the site of the old Lowry bombing range. Now in its 75th year, the hunt is one of the oldest in the West. It was started in 1907, took a short break during World War I, but resumed coyote-terrorizing operations in 1929 and has been going full gallop ever since. Anyone with a horse can join in the fun, as long as he's willing to ride well and follow local customs.


This one's for the birds. That's who Wheat Ridge resident and nature-lover Karen Heine had in mind (along with the foxes, squirrels and occasional deer wandering through) as she worked to create a woodland paradise on undeveloped land she purchased expressly for that purpose. Located off 44th Avenue between Parfet and Oak streets, the vacant parcel of land was a trash heap when Heine first bought it; now, after adding hundreds of plants, an irrigation system, sheltering rocks, bird feeders, Girl Scout-built bluebird houses and even a water hole, it's a tiny northwest-metro treasure where Heine conducts tours for schoolchildren. The pice de résistance? Last spring, Heine worked to have the plot designated a Wheat Ridge conservation zone, thereby ensuring its existence for years to come.
This one's for the birds. That's who Wheat Ridge resident and nature-lover Karen Heine had in mind (along with the foxes, squirrels and occasional deer wandering through) as she worked to create a woodland paradise on undeveloped land she purchased expressly for that purpose. Located off 44th Avenue between Parfet and Oak streets, the vacant parcel of land was a trash heap when Heine first bought it; now, after adding hundreds of plants, an irrigation system, sheltering rocks, bird feeders, Girl Scout-built bluebird houses and even a water hole, it's a tiny northwest-metro treasure where Heine conducts tours for schoolchildren. The pice de résistance? Last spring, Heine worked to have the plot designated a Wheat Ridge conservation zone, thereby ensuring its existence for years to come.


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