On many days, news is secondary to shenanigans on Channel 9's ultra-popular morning news block. On an early March broadcast, for example, a gaggle of NFL mascots turned Kathy Sabine's weather forecast and Drew Soicher's sports segment into a complete shambles. Such absurdity would be highly questionable at other times of the day, but as the sun rises, having a quintet as likable as Sabine, Soicher, Gary Shapiro, Kyle Dyer and Gregg Moss on hand helps viewers get up and get going, too.


Since the arrival of new general manager Walt DeHaven, Channel 4 has exhibited more vitality and ambition than at any time in recent memory, and the quality of its 10 p.m. offering has climbed as a result. Anchor Jim Benemann, hijacked from Channel 9, has proven to be a key addition, and the chemistry he exhibits with partner Molly Hughes is tangible without seeming either self-conscious or over the top. As a bonus, the program's large and impressive team can be counted upon to provide the most comprehensive wrap-up of the day's news.
Since the arrival of new general manager Walt DeHaven, Channel 4 has exhibited more vitality and ambition than at any time in recent memory, and the quality of its 10 p.m. offering has climbed as a result. Anchor Jim Benemann, hijacked from Channel 9, has proven to be a key addition, and the chemistry he exhibits with partner Molly Hughes is tangible without seeming either self-conscious or over the top. As a bonus, the program's large and impressive team can be counted upon to provide the most comprehensive wrap-up of the day's news.


All too often, investigative reports on local TV stations are frivolous attention-getters more focused on attracting viewers during ratings periods than doing anything of substance. Maass's work is an exception to this rule. He regularly comes up with stories that are as solid as they are intriguing -- we'd love to know his police sources -- and he presents them in a just-the-facts manner that won't make those with an aversion to tabloid TV feel like showering once the report's over.
All too often, investigative reports on local TV stations are frivolous attention-getters more focused on attracting viewers during ratings periods than doing anything of substance. Maass's work is an exception to this rule. He regularly comes up with stories that are as solid as they are intriguing -- we'd love to know his police sources -- and he presents them in a just-the-facts manner that won't make those with an aversion to tabloid TV feel like showering once the report's over.


For those Denverites who don't want to wait through news and wade through weather to get to sports, Rocky Mountain Sports Report, on Fox Sports Rocky Mountain, provides immediate gratification, not to mention a much more in-depth presentation than is available on any of the other local newscasts. Anchor Tim Ring is a fine host with a welcome, low-key approach, and Marc Soicher (Drew's brother) blends in much more smoothly here than he did at his previous station, Channel 4. There's no telling how the show will hold up when Fox Sports loses the rights to Denver Nuggets and Colorado Avalanche broadcasts, as it will in the next year because the teams' owner, Stan Kroenke, is starting his own network. But for now, this Report provides the best sports in town.
For those Denverites who don't want to wait through news and wade through weather to get to sports, Rocky Mountain Sports Report, on Fox Sports Rocky Mountain, provides immediate gratification, not to mention a much more in-depth presentation than is available on any of the other local newscasts. Anchor Tim Ring is a fine host with a welcome, low-key approach, and Marc Soicher (Drew's brother) blends in much more smoothly here than he did at his previous station, Channel 4. There's no telling how the show will hold up when Fox Sports loses the rights to Denver Nuggets and Colorado Avalanche broadcasts, as it will in the next year because the teams' owner, Stan Kroenke, is starting his own network. But for now, this Report provides the best sports in town.


Many Denver television personalities are severely lacking in the "personality" part of the equation. Not so Vic Lombardi, who makes every sporting event he covers seem more interesting because he infuses his descriptions with energy and enthusiasm. Steve Atkinson, a competent but fairly bland fellow, gets top billing on Channel 4's highest-profile programming, but Lombardi's likability and high-voltage delivery make him the station's real standout.
Many Denver television personalities are severely lacking in the "personality" part of the equation. Not so Vic Lombardi, who makes every sporting event he covers seem more interesting because he infuses his descriptions with energy and enthusiasm. Steve Atkinson, a competent but fairly bland fellow, gets top billing on Channel 4's highest-profile programming, but Lombardi's likability and high-voltage delivery make him the station's real standout.
Bertha Lynn has been on Denver television long enough to have made a cameo in both the 1980 version of Stephen King's The Shining -- the one starring Jack Nicholson -- and a 1997 TV remake headlined by Steven Weber (apparently the poor man's Jack Nicholson). Still, longevity and experience are only a couple of her noteworthy attributes. She's also got a warm and compassionate on-air approach that's appropriate when talking about subjects both heavy and light. Lynn's an underappreciated Denver original who's definitely ready for her close-up.

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