Second-Best Question Called In to the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce

"Hi, I'm calling from Houston, and we're coming to visit. Can you tell me if it is appropriate to wear capris there?"


Third-Best Question Called In to the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce

"I was told there was a restaurant in Denver called Casa Bonita. Are they still open, and do they really have naked divers?"

Third-Best Question Called In to the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce

"I was told there was a restaurant in Denver called Casa Bonita. Are they still open, and do they really have naked divers?"

Fourth-Best Question Called In to the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce

"How many pets are you allowed to keep in Colorado? Could you also tell me how many dogs and cats are already there?"

Fourth-Best Question Called In to the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce

"How many pets are you allowed to keep in Colorado? Could you also tell me how many dogs and cats are already there?"


It shouldn't have come as such a surprise. Not if you'd looked at the changing demographics of Denver. Not if you'd read Richard Florida's The Rise of the Creative Class. Not, really, if you'd ever even seen geeky beer baron John Hickenlooper work a room, even if that room was the bar at the Wynkoop Brewing Co. right around closing time, when Hickenlooper would start waving his arms as he described some idea that would be really great for this city. An idea like saving the Mile High Stadium name -- a campaign he lost, sort of, but which paved the way for his mayoral bid. No, it shouldn't have come as a surprise, but when Hickenlooper jumped into an already crowded field of mayoral candidates and proceeded to speed past all of them, it shocked the hell out of pundits and power brokers alike. More surprising still: the impressive job Hickenlooper's done thus far.
It shouldn't have come as such a surprise. Not if you'd looked at the changing demographics of Denver. Not if you'd read Richard Florida's The Rise of the Creative Class. Not, really, if you'd ever even seen geeky beer baron John Hickenlooper work a room, even if that room was the bar at the Wynkoop Brewing Co. right around closing time, when Hickenlooper would start waving his arms as he described some idea that would be really great for this city. An idea like saving the Mile High Stadium name -- a campaign he lost, sort of, but which paved the way for his mayoral bid. No, it shouldn't have come as a surprise, but when Hickenlooper jumped into an already crowded field of mayoral candidates and proceeded to speed past all of them, it shocked the hell out of pundits and power brokers alike. More surprising still: the impressive job Hickenlooper's done thus far.


You'd think that besting seven other candidates in the mayoral race would be enough for John Hickenlooper. But you'd be wrong. Denver's new mayor is always up for a challenge. During his campaign, he promised that he'd visit a Denver school every week, and while in an elementary-school gymnasium on one of those visits, he spotted a set of climbing ropes hanging from the ceiling. On the spot, he challenged mayoral aide/driver/much younger guy Tony Young -- and then proceeded to win a race to the top, while amazed students cheered below.
You'd think that besting seven other candidates in the mayoral race would be enough for John Hickenlooper. But you'd be wrong. Denver's new mayor is always up for a challenge. During his campaign, he promised that he'd visit a Denver school every week, and while in an elementary-school gymnasium on one of those visits, he spotted a set of climbing ropes hanging from the ceiling. On the spot, he challenged mayoral aide/driver/much younger guy Tony Young -- and then proceeded to win a race to the top, while amazed students cheered below.


In February, as legislators began professing their support for Marilyn Musgrave's Federal Marriage Amendment, the Rocky Mountain Progressive Network asked all elected officials who support a ban against gay marriage to sign a "fidelity pledge."

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