The Golden Community Center's got it all under one roof: a six-lane lap pool, a therapy pool and an awesome kids' pool designed to provide a great swimming experience for all, regardless of age or level of water wisdom. Babies in swim diapers are in their element in gradually graded shallows that mimic the seashore, while older kids can romp through everything from fountains and waterfalls to a challenging floating bridge and a gigantic, 150-foot water slide. But the GCC really makes a splash with its birthday parties. Packages include all of the above plus a large private party room. And because everything's indoors, the parties are perfect in any season.


Four Mile Historic Park, perched along the Cherry Creek Greenway, is an agrarian jewel, a throwback to earlier times smack-dab in the middle of the city. And it's a heck of a lot better than the rigors of Chuck E. Cheese's for kids' birthday parties. Instead of video games and rides, Four Mile offers horse-drawn wagon rides, pioneer and/or tepee games, cake-baking in an open-fire oven, old-timey crafts, and feeding the farm animals, which include roosters, fat hens, gorgeous screw-horned sheep and a pair of French Percheron horses. It's reasonably priced, more fun than a three-legged race, and there's no mouse telling you what to do.
Four Mile Historic Park, perched along the Cherry Creek Greenway, is an agrarian jewel, a throwback to earlier times smack-dab in the middle of the city. And it's a heck of a lot better than the rigors of Chuck E. Cheese's for kids' birthday parties. Instead of video games and rides, Four Mile offers horse-drawn wagon rides, pioneer and/or tepee games, cake-baking in an open-fire oven, old-timey crafts, and feeding the farm animals, which include roosters, fat hens, gorgeous screw-horned sheep and a pair of French Percheron horses. It's reasonably priced, more fun than a three-legged race, and there's no mouse telling you what to do.


Few people know it, but deepest concrete LoDo boasts its own tennis court. Available by invitation only, the Blake Street Bath and Racquet Club was built as part of a condo project in the 1970s. Now surrounded by new lofts with iron-fenced balconies, the court is just barely visible from the street. "There is more playing space on the ends and sides than most urban residential courts, but sharply angled volleys and serves still produce excitement and results," a tennis historian wrote about it a couple years back in Colorado Tennis.
Few people know it, but deepest concrete LoDo boasts its own tennis court. Available by invitation only, the Blake Street Bath and Racquet Club was built as part of a condo project in the 1970s. Now surrounded by new lofts with iron-fenced balconies, the court is just barely visible from the street. "There is more playing space on the ends and sides than most urban residential courts, but sharply angled volleys and serves still produce excitement and results," a tennis historian wrote about it a couple years back in Colorado Tennis.


If you're looking for perfect bounces and ideal lighting, the solitary, hidden tennis court at 10th Avenue and Olive Street might not be for you. But if you want atmosphere, you'd be hard-pressed to find a better place to play a few sets. Encased by beautiful mature, ivy-covered fences, the court was built by the grandfather of Denver tennis doyenne Mary Silverstein in 1891. For the next half-century, the family used it as a private court, as well as a bike-riding training ground and an ice-skating rink. Today it's known to only a handful of locals, most of whom use its undulating surface to ride skateboards and bicycles. Still, if you can find it, it's worthwhile to stop and hit a few strokes, just for the quiet history.
If you're looking for perfect bounces and ideal lighting, the solitary, hidden tennis court at 10th Avenue and Olive Street might not be for you. But if you want atmosphere, you'd be hard-pressed to find a better place to play a few sets. Encased by beautiful mature, ivy-covered fences, the court was built by the grandfather of Denver tennis doyenne Mary Silverstein in 1891. For the next half-century, the family used it as a private court, as well as a bike-riding training ground and an ice-skating rink. Today it's known to only a handful of locals, most of whom use its undulating surface to ride skateboards and bicycles. Still, if you can find it, it's worthwhile to stop and hit a few strokes, just for the quiet history.


Denver Tennis Club
Plenty of new tennis courts have sprung up around the metro area as wealthy residents have pushed into the suburbs. But after a layer of Har-Tru and a chain-link fence, what really distinguishes one place from another? The answer is feel and tradition; after all, Wimbledon without history is just another place for Brits to frolic on the lawn. For this reason, the Denver Tennis Club's dozen courts (two of them clay) get the nod. This past year, the club celebrated its 75th anniversary. Since 1928, the Denver City Open has been held there every year except 1950, when a spat among members temporarily forced the tennis tournament back to City Park. The only downside to the place? No lights -- and the cost of joining has climbed somewhat since the first $5 initiation and $15 annual fees were levied. Today it'll cost you $675 to sign on and $465 per year for membership.
Plenty of new tennis courts have sprung up around the metro area as wealthy residents have pushed into the suburbs. But after a layer of Har-Tru and a chain-link fence, what really distinguishes one place from another? The answer is feel and tradition; after all, Wimbledon without history is just another place for Brits to frolic on the lawn. For this reason, the Denver Tennis Club's dozen courts (two of them clay) get the nod. This past year, the club celebrated its 75th anniversary. Since 1928, the Denver City Open has been held there every year except 1950, when a spat among members temporarily forced the tennis tournament back to City Park. The only downside to the place? No lights -- and the cost of joining has climbed somewhat since the first $5 initiation and $15 annual fees were levied. Today it'll cost you $675 to sign on and $465 per year for membership.
Fossil Trace Golf Course
Let's just agree that any golfing experience is enhanced by the presence of a genuine triceratops footprint etched into the rocks dotted about the course. This summer will mark the first anniversary of the opening of Fossil Trace, the city of Golden's entrance into the lucrative business of civic golf. The public course ($36 per eighteen holes for Golden residents, $41 for Jeffco residents, $46 for everyone else) has garnered numerous awards for its unique setting and use of local features. Most notable: the twenty-foot high sandstone rock formations pocked with fossils that ring the twelfth hole.

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