For a few glorious weeks last year, Skyjack Radio, a thoroughly illegal radio station, knocked the Denver hip-hop community on its collective ass with uncut rap delivered with sheer exuberance and plenty of profanities. When representatives of the FCC caught wind of the signal, they promptly shut it down, but not before it reminded listeners of how fun and exciting the radio medium can be when it's under the control of music lovers instead of corporate suits more interested in profits than beats.


Although conservative commentators have long held that news programming on television has a liberal slant, the media as a whole is generally more interested in maintaining the status quo than in fighting the powers that be. Not so Free Speech TV, a channel out of Boulder that's viewable by subscribers to the DISH Network system. This grassroots operation is unabashedly progressive -- a haven for those who want television that states its opinions clearly instead of pretending that it doesn't have any.


Although conservative commentators have long held that news programming on television has a liberal slant, the media as a whole is generally more interested in maintaining the status quo than in fighting the powers that be. Not so Free Speech TV, a channel out of Boulder that's viewable by subscribers to the DISH Network system. This grassroots operation is unabashedly progressive -- a haven for those who want television that states its opinions clearly instead of pretending that it doesn't have any.
The fall 2002 campaign season was among the noisiest, and dirtiest, on record. So it came as a blessed relief when Bighorn Ballot produced a spot in which a peaceful nature scene was supplemented at its conclusion with a graphic reading "This moment of political silence brought to you by Bighorn Ballot, sponsor of Issues 28 and 29." Since both of those measures were rejected by voters, though, don't expect the experiment to be repeated again by anyone other than the folks at Rocky's Autos, who've used a similar concept the past two holiday seasons. But the tranquility was nice while it lasted.
The fall 2002 campaign season was among the noisiest, and dirtiest, on record. So it came as a blessed relief when Bighorn Ballot produced a spot in which a peaceful nature scene was supplemented at its conclusion with a graphic reading "This moment of political silence brought to you by Bighorn Ballot, sponsor of Issues 28 and 29." Since both of those measures were rejected by voters, though, don't expect the experiment to be repeated again by anyone other than the folks at Rocky's Autos, who've used a similar concept the past two holiday seasons. But the tranquility was nice while it lasted.

Best Political Commercial -- 2003 Campaign

"Suit"

John Hickenlooper isn't your usual candidate for mayor of Denver, and so it was no surprise when he came up with an unusual TV ad. Still, when so many Colorado political ads are either heavy-handed or ham-handed in delivering their message, "Suit," which shows Hickenlooper trying on an assortment of vintage outfits, was a breath of fresh air in what promises to be a very windy campaign.


Best Political Commercial -- 2003 Campaign

"Suit"

John Hickenlooper isn't your usual candidate for mayor of Denver, and so it was no surprise when he came up with an unusual TV ad. Still, when so many Colorado political ads are either heavy-handed or ham-handed in delivering their message, "Suit," which shows Hickenlooper trying on an assortment of vintage outfits, was a breath of fresh air in what promises to be a very windy campaign.
Most of us realize that a hefty percentage of the shows on Denver radio stations are repetitive, creativity-free and capable of insulting the intelligence of the average house plant, yet we don't do anything about it but complain. So kudos to Jon-Michael DeShazer, who refuses to take the mediocrity of local radio lying down. DenverRadioSucks.com, the Internet site he oversees, is a forum for all listeners who are mad as hell about what's happening on the airwaves and don't want to take it anymore.


Most of us realize that a hefty percentage of the shows on Denver radio stations are repetitive, creativity-free and capable of insulting the intelligence of the average house plant, yet we don't do anything about it but complain. So kudos to Jon-Michael DeShazer, who refuses to take the mediocrity of local radio lying down. DenverRadioSucks.com, the Internet site he oversees, is a forum for all listeners who are mad as hell about what's happening on the airwaves and don't want to take it anymore.
KNRC, which debuted last summer, hasn't yet challenged the hegemony of the assorted Clear Channel outlets that dominate the local news-talk market. But Greg Dobbs, a former ABC-TV correspondent who manned a talk-show for KOA during the '90s, is certainly doing his part. His morning-drive offerings are consistently intelligent and wide-ranging, providing substantive discussions about topics obvious and obscure. In addition, Dobbs serves as the host of State of Colorado, a Friday morning KNRC discussion show derived from a longtime Channel 6 staple. The program works far better on radio than it ever did on TV -- and Dobbs has made the transition just as well.

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