Speed is relative, the universe is expanding, so why does your vintage '57 Chevy's speedometer say you're traveling at 5 mph? Better chug on over to the dean of those devices, Russell Rullo, at Deluxe Speedometer & Radio Service. With more than fifty years of experience, Rullo (along with his son, John) will bring a truckload of experience to bear on whatever ails your ride. Number, please!


When queried, most boat-shop owners said they sent their broken propellers to Jim's Prop Shop, and who are we to swim against the tide? Owner Jim McCune charges between $45 and $150 to fix maimed props, depending on what sort of sea damage you've done. And although Jim's specialty is fixing them, you can buy new and used propellers here, too. Sail on, sailors.


Best Map to Take on a Plane Out of DIA

Spin Maps

So you begged for a window seat, but now you're just staring aimlessly down on windswept plains, unknown deserts or the canyons below. What could possibly make your long flight more interesting? A little help from the Durango-based Spin Map company, which manufactures passenger flight maps for journeys stretching between Denver and several major cities, including L.A., Las Vegas, Dallas, San Francisco, Phoenix and Chicago. The maps, which are available at many local bookstores, are laminated and "spinable," so no matter which side of the plane you're seated on, your handy map will provide a detailed geographic tour of the topography unfolding below. Now buckle your seat belt, grab your Spin Map, and get ready to learn geography from way up high. Happy landings.

Best Thing to Do When You Have Two Extra Hours at DIA

Que Bueno!
Concourse B

It used to be that if you got to the airport early, you'd head up to the official U.S. Post Office in the main terminal to pay your bills (on the theory that the best flight insurance is making sure your survivors won't find any embarrassing past-due notices), then do some banking, enjoy a couple of brews and take a look at the latest exhibit on the walkway heading toward Concourse A. But that was then, this is now. And in the post-9/11 world, no one dawdles on the way to security -- not because getting felt up by DIA's enthusiastic friskers is such a treat, but because you can't risk getting stuck in a slow-moving line. Which means, of course, that when you get through security quickly, your entertainment options are limited to the concourses. That's when it's time to head to Que Bueno! on Concourse B, where the burritos are so tasty, so big and so fat that it might take you a couple of hours to digest one. But fair warning: Que Bueno! is a lot more crowded than it used to be, which means you could waste many, many minutes waiting to order -- and then still more arguing that, yes, you really want that sauce fuego.


You're taking the last plane out of Clarksville, and you forgot your book. And your gum, your bottled water and your earplugs. Not to worry: W. H. Smith keeps one of its six airport shops open all night, and it's conveniently located in the main terminal, right outside the security checkpoint that's the last to shut down for the night. In keeping with its 24/7 status, the shop stocks a wider variety of items than you'll find at its concourse outlets, including reading materials, snacks and travel necessities. Those landing at DIA in the wee hours, after their planes have been socked in by the weather in Omaha, might want to stop by and stock up on aspirin: They'll need some after they realize that the shuttles have quit running.

Best Place to Find Sewer Help on New Year's Eve

Colorado Sewer Service

You're dressed up in your best Soup-and-Fish or evening gown, just about to trip the light fantastic on New Year's Eve, when you detect a murky puddle oozing up from the basement drain. Who ya gonna call? Try Colorado Sewer. While they can't work miracles, they do work that evening. And with a little luck, you can have whatever ails your house snaked out so that you can still sneak out before the stroke of midnight.


The Emily Griffith Opportunity School (EGOS) has been an educational resource for over 85 years, but even Miss Emily herself would be amazed to see its 21st-century outreach. Folks seeking careers in everything from aviation to manicuring can click on the school's site and start flying. Visitors also can see photos of recent grads, hints on finances and other good things. And if you don't like the school's Web site, sign up for EGOS Web design classes -- maybe you can be its next creator.


The DPL's impressive effort to post thousands of images from its photography archives - images of Colorado and the West stretching over a century and a half, with extensive collections dealing with everything from the Ludlow Massacre to the changing face of Denver's downtown--is a cyber surfer's delight. Browse, search or wallow, if you prefer, but click on over and travel back in time.


Admit it: You have plenty of time to read, but not enough time to browse the local library. At the Highlands Ranch Library, adult patrons can have librarians select titles that match their tastes simply by filling out an application including information on favorite authors and books read in the past. They'll call you when your books are ready for pickup; it's that simple. Make that one John Grisham with a side of Stephen King to go.


The Colorado Talking Book Library (CTBL) was created to give disabled book-lovers more options. The government-funded program offers Braille books, taped books and playback machines. You must apply and meet certain requirements to use the facility, but once you do, it's completely free, including usage and shipping of the books and machines. Adding to the convenience, books may be ordered by phone.


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