Last year, when Ninth Avenue West became La Rumba, the club shifted its focus from swing to salsa, a move that reduced the number of wing tip wearers in the crowd while upping its quotient of Latin-music lovers. Now the club is sometimes known as Trinity, a progressive dance environment that has welcomed glow-stick-carrying denizens, international acts like the Basement Jaxx and also spinning sessions from the fabulous Freakbeat DJ duo. Sound like an identity crisis? Nah. It's a smart use of a great space. Let's get ready to Rumba.
Last year, when Ninth Avenue West became La Rumba, the club shifted its focus from swing to salsa, a move that reduced the number of wing tip wearers in the crowd while upping its quotient of Latin-music lovers. Now the club is sometimes known as Trinity, a progressive dance environment that has welcomed glow-stick-carrying denizens, international acts like the Basement Jaxx and also spinning sessions from the fabulous Freakbeat DJ duo. Sound like an identity crisis? Nah. It's a smart use of a great space. Let's get ready to Rumba.
Sure, it sounds better after a couple (or several) tall drafts and maybe a bowl of chips. But regardless of your sobriety level, it's a pretty safe bet that on any given night, the Satire will be filled with folks who've been there for a while -- folks who are ready to sing like Ethel Merman on Xanax. Bar-wide renderings of all the hits from the Beatles, the Doors, Jimi Hendrix and James Brown are almost as much a part of the Satire scene as the saucy bartenders and Joe the waiter's warning that your plate is hot. Just don't forget to raise your glass when you raise your voice in song.

Pete's Satire Restaurant and Lounge
Danielle Lirette
Sure, it sounds better after a couple (or several) tall drafts and maybe a bowl of chips. But regardless of your sobriety level, it's a pretty safe bet that on any given night, the Satire will be filled with folks who've been there for a while -- folks who are ready to sing like Ethel Merman on Xanax. Bar-wide renderings of all the hits from the Beatles, the Doors, Jimi Hendrix and James Brown are almost as much a part of the Satire scene as the saucy bartenders and Joe the waiter's warning that your plate is hot. Just don't forget to raise your glass when you raise your voice in song.

Most of the week, Turk's Supper Club is a friendly blue-collar joint where you can get a decent burger and a beer for about six bucks. On Monday nights, however, the pool tables are moved to the side to make way for an old-fashioned bandstand and the twenty-person-plus Denver Jazz Orchestra, which uses the historic tavern as a practice and performance space. Led by trumpeter Sam Bivens -- who came to Denver by way of New York City and has spent nearly sixty years as a professional jazzman -- the DJO finds both young and older musicians traversing a repertoire of Big Band-era classics alongside more modern sounds. The free weekly events are simply music to the ears.

Most of the week, Turk's Supper Club is a friendly blue-collar joint where you can get a decent burger and a beer for about six bucks. On Monday nights, however, the pool tables are moved to the side to make way for an old-fashioned bandstand and the twenty-person-plus Denver Jazz Orchestra, which uses the historic tavern as a practice and performance space. Led by trumpeter Sam Bivens -- who came to Denver by way of New York City and has spent nearly sixty years as a professional jazzman -- the DJO finds both young and older musicians traversing a repertoire of Big Band-era classics alongside more modern sounds. The free weekly events are simply music to the ears.

No one in Denver works as hard -- or is in as much demand -- as Fury, the city's premier jungle DJ. In addition to spinning at several raves each month, DJ Fury maintains two weekly club residencies ("Breakdown" at the Snake Pit on Thursday nights and "The Globe" at Maximillian's on Tuesday nights). When he isn't heading up his own Reload Productions company, Fury also works as a resident DJ for Together Productions and L.A.'s Insomniac Productions, two of the biggest rave production companies in the nation. This year he gained representation by Champion Sound Management out of San Diego, which manages some of the biggest names in the national club scene; since then, the number of Fury's out-of-town bookings has soared. With a DJ mix CD forthcoming on local Terraform Records and several mix tapes in the works, Fury's pace is simply furious.
No one in Denver works as hard -- or is in as much demand -- as Fury, the city's premier jungle DJ. In addition to spinning at several raves each month, DJ Fury maintains two weekly club residencies ("Breakdown" at the Snake Pit on Thursday nights and "The Globe" at Maximillian's on Tuesday nights). When he isn't heading up his own Reload Productions company, Fury also works as a resident DJ for Together Productions and L.A.'s Insomniac Productions, two of the biggest rave production companies in the nation. This year he gained representation by Champion Sound Management out of San Diego, which manages some of the biggest names in the national club scene; since then, the number of Fury's out-of-town bookings has soared. With a DJ mix CD forthcoming on local Terraform Records and several mix tapes in the works, Fury's pace is simply furious.
Owner Scott Heron has crammed his boombox with eras of rockabilly, blues and early country, from Bob Wills and Hank Williams to Elvis, Etta James and more. Johnny Cash and Johnny Horton share space with the Haywoods and Go Cat Go, pure proof that "rock and roll is here to stay."

Owner Scott Heron has crammed his boombox with eras of rockabilly, blues and early country, from Bob Wills and Hank Williams to Elvis, Etta James and more. Johnny Cash and Johnny Horton share space with the Haywoods and Go Cat Go, pure proof that "rock and roll is here to stay."

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