The Colorado Lottery didn't think it was taking a gamble when it hired noted local advertising firm Karsh & Hagan Communications to produce its TV ads, and at first the decision paid off. Karsh & Hagan created some excellent and very funny ads, including the "Stranger Things Have Happened" series. In one of those ads, the company used the story of a San Francisco police officer who walked his beat carrying a wooden puppet dressed as a cop. Although his department tried to make him stop, the officer, Bob Geary, went to the media and was allowed to continue carrying Brendan O'Smarty (the dummy) with him. The Colorado Lottery's luck ran out, however, when Geary sued, claiming the agency had used his likeness without his permission (the case was transferred from San Francisco to Denver in April). In the suit, Geary also claims that the Colorado Lottery used him in order to entice children to gamble. Better luck next time.

Readers' choice: Rocky's Auto

In late August, Channel 7's helicopter videotaped a car chase that ended with Denver police officers beating the suspects they'd pursued. Not only was the footage a sterling display of pricey, state-of-the-art technology, but it generated some real news by providing graphic evidence of a police department run amok. That's the kind of thing television is supposed to do.
In late August, Channel 7's helicopter videotaped a car chase that ended with Denver police officers beating the suspects they'd pursued. Not only was the footage a sterling display of pricey, state-of-the-art technology, but it generated some real news by providing graphic evidence of a police department run amok. That's the kind of thing television is supposed to do.
Like a number of other stations, Channel 4 is now supplementing its morning news broadcasts with an info banner that runs along the bottom of the screen. Some of the data presented is superfluous: How many times do we need to see what temperature it's going to be at noon? But the notes about drive times on major thoroughfares, presented in the simplest, most user-friendly manner possible, are a godsend for anyone who may not have time to stick around for the more complete traffic reports offered up by Luan Akin, local TV's finest eye in the sky. In addition, Channel 4 continues to offer Pinpoint Traffic, an easy-to-read map that allows viewers to see how their personal drives are moving -- or not. Consider these features a road-rage chill pill.
Like a number of other stations, Channel 4 is now supplementing its morning news broadcasts with an info banner that runs along the bottom of the screen. Some of the data presented is superfluous: How many times do we need to see what temperature it's going to be at noon? But the notes about drive times on major thoroughfares, presented in the simplest, most user-friendly manner possible, are a godsend for anyone who may not have time to stick around for the more complete traffic reports offered up by Luan Akin, local TV's finest eye in the sky. In addition, Channel 4 continues to offer Pinpoint Traffic, an easy-to-read map that allows viewers to see how their personal drives are moving -- or not. Consider these features a road-rage chill pill.
Marc Soicher favors the sort of slicked-back coiffure associated with Miami Heat coach Pat Riley and modern mafiosi; he always seems ready to make his viewers an offer they can't refuse. The style must be hereditary: Channel 9 sportscaster Drew Soicher, Marc's brother/doppelganger, wears a version of it, too. Their arrival in the market has meant boom times in the hair-oil industry.

Readers' choice: Ed Greene, Channel 9

Marc Soicher favors the sort of slicked-back coiffure associated with Miami Heat coach Pat Riley and modern mafiosi; he always seems ready to make his viewers an offer they can't refuse. The style must be hereditary: Channel 9 sportscaster Drew Soicher, Marc's brother/doppelganger, wears a version of it, too. Their arrival in the market has meant boom times in the hair-oil industry.

Readers' choice: Ed Greene, Channel 9

Best hair on a local TV personality -- female

Kyle Dyer, Channel 9

The cut that adorns Kyle Dyer, who co-hosts Channel 9's morning block, seems simple, but it's deceptively complex. Her swingy, springy helmet of black hair represents a style midway between pixie and Prince Valiant that's perfect for a woman on the move. You go, girl.

Readers' choice: Aimee Sporer, Channel 4

Best hair on a local TV personality -- female

Kyle Dyer, Channel 9

The cut that adorns Kyle Dyer, who co-hosts Channel 9's morning block, seems simple, but it's deceptively complex. Her swingy, springy helmet of black hair represents a style midway between pixie and Prince Valiant that's perfect for a woman on the move. You go, girl.

Readers' choice: Aimee Sporer, Channel 4

He'll give it to you straight.

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