When he was alive, cable mogul Bill Daniels was known for his generosity toward employees and colleagues alike, helping dozens of locals launch their own businesses. When he passed away earlier this year, Daniels left the bulk of his $1.4 billion estate to create a foundation that will become Colorado's largest, giving out 5 percent of its assets every year. About 75 percent of the foundation's annual donations will be made in Colorado, but Daniels didn't forget our neighboring states: the other 25 percent is earmarked for Wyoming, Utah, and New Mexico. Education and health care are expected to be priorities for the new Daniels Fund, and Coloradans should have reason to be grateful to Daniels for years to come.
When he was alive, cable mogul Bill Daniels was known for his generosity toward employees and colleagues alike, helping dozens of locals launch their own businesses. When he passed away earlier this year, Daniels left the bulk of his $1.4 billion estate to create a foundation that will become Colorado's largest, giving out 5 percent of its assets every year. About 75 percent of the foundation's annual donations will be made in Colorado, but Daniels didn't forget our neighboring states: the other 25 percent is earmarked for Wyoming, Utah, and New Mexico. Education and health care are expected to be priorities for the new Daniels Fund, and Coloradans should have reason to be grateful to Daniels for years to come.

Best way for Denver to celebrate the real start of the millennium

Party! Party!

And we're talking a big party, too -- a genuine blowout downtown, where Denver residents can dance in the streets instead of being tossed off of them by jackbooted cops, as they were during last year's party-pooping December 31 crackdown. Hey, it wasn't the real start to the millennium, anyway, city officials belatedly pointed out. So true. And now we're expecting big things from Denver on December 31, 2000, starting with a downtown open house complete with entertainment and ending with fireworks at Coors Field. Any chance of that? Stay tuned, says mayoral spokesman Andrew Hudson: Wellington Webb will discuss this very topic during his annual State of the City speech in early July.

Readers' choice: Multi-block party

Best way for Denver to celebrate the real start of the millennium

Party! Party!

And we're talking a big party, too -- a genuine blowout downtown, where Denver residents can dance in the streets instead of being tossed off of them by jackbooted cops, as they were during last year's party-pooping December 31 crackdown. Hey, it wasn't the real start to the millennium, anyway, city officials belatedly pointed out. So true. And now we're expecting big things from Denver on December 31, 2000, starting with a downtown open house complete with entertainment and ending with fireworks at Coors Field. Any chance of that? Stay tuned, says mayoral spokesman Andrew Hudson: Wellington Webb will discuss this very topic during his annual State of the City speech in early July.

Readers' choice: Multi-block party

He's everywhere! He's everywhere! When Bill Gates came to town, who sat up front, looking more Microsofty than Gates himself? John Hickenlooper. When it's time to pick a new architect for the Denver Art Museum, who will be putting his Beatlemania-coiffed head next to that of First Lady Wilma Webb? John Hickenlooper. Ever since the self-professed recovering geologist got involved with Denver's first brewpub -- the now venerable Wynkoop Brewing Company -- he's been a landmark on our local scene, albeit a rather peripatetic one. And with his latest crusade, Hickenlooper's really standing tall: The Wynkoop is now serving as headquarters for the campaign to save the Mile High Stadium name, a fight armed not just with sentiment, but hard economic facts. Cheers!

He's everywhere! He's everywhere! When Bill Gates came to town, who sat up front, looking more Microsofty than Gates himself? John Hickenlooper. When it's time to pick a new architect for the Denver Art Museum, who will be putting his Beatlemania-coiffed head next to that of First Lady Wilma Webb? John Hickenlooper. Ever since the self-professed recovering geologist got involved with Denver's first brewpub -- the now venerable Wynkoop Brewing Company -- he's been a landmark on our local scene, albeit a rather peripatetic one. And with his latest crusade, Hickenlooper's really standing tall: The Wynkoop is now serving as headquarters for the campaign to save the Mile High Stadium name, a fight armed not just with sentiment, but hard economic facts. Cheers!

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