Man does not live by pizza alone, although he could give it a good try at Pasquini's. In fact, the fat, cheese-blanketed pies are so good that most Pasquini's diners don't make it to dessert. And that's a shame, because Pasquini's serves the best chocolate cake in town -- an enormous wedge that's simultaneously dense and fluffy, fervently chocolate and stunningly rich. A chocolate-pumped whipped cream holds the layers together, with a decadent chocolate buttercream frosting topping things off. Any way you slice it -- and whatever you slice up -- Pasquini's comes out a winner.

Man does not live by pizza alone, although he could give it a good try at Pasquini's. In fact, the fat, cheese-blanketed pies are so good that most Pasquini's diners don't make it to dessert. And that's a shame, because Pasquini's serves the best chocolate cake in town -- an enormous wedge that's simultaneously dense and fluffy, fervently chocolate and stunningly rich. A chocolate-pumped whipped cream holds the layers together, with a decadent chocolate buttercream frosting topping things off. Any way you slice it -- and whatever you slice up -- Pasquini's comes out a winner.

Tired of stuffing your kids with the same old hot dogs, chicken planks, pizza bites and mac and cheese? Not as tired as they are of being stuffed with the stuff. Treat them like big people and take them to Roy's, where the kids' meals are just as special as the adults', and all ages are treated to some of the best service in town. For ten bucks, your child gets a four-course repast (drink included), starting with elegantly arranged cheese-filled quesadillas, followed by a plate of artfully carved apples, celery and carrot strings with ranch dressing for dipping, and then his choice of penne in a marinara or butter sauce, or Roy's chicken wings coated with a sticky-sweet, Asian-inspired (but non-spicy) barbecue sauce. For dessert, tykes get a mini sundae, with the scoop of ice cream stuck to the plate by a big wad of ganache. And if your kids don't know what ganache is, well, all the more reason to get them to Roy's.

Tired of stuffing your kids with the same old hot dogs, chicken planks, pizza bites and mac and cheese? Not as tired as they are of being stuffed with the stuff. Treat them like big people and take them to Roy's, where the kids' meals are just as special as the adults', and all ages are treated to some of the best service in town. For ten bucks, your child gets a four-course repast (drink included), starting with elegantly arranged cheese-filled quesadillas, followed by a plate of artfully carved apples, celery and carrot strings with ranch dressing for dipping, and then his choice of penne in a marinara or butter sauce, or Roy's chicken wings coated with a sticky-sweet, Asian-inspired (but non-spicy) barbecue sauce. For dessert, tykes get a mini sundae, with the scoop of ice cream stuck to the plate by a big wad of ganache. And if your kids don't know what ganache is, well, all the more reason to get them to Roy's.

Govnr's Park Restaurant & Tavern
When a divorced parent decides to dine out with the kids, it's important to do so in an atmosphere as comfortable for the little ones as it is for Mom or Dad. At Govnr's Park, a longtime central Denver hangout, the scene is relaxed and casual (unless, that is, you met your future ex- over a big margarita here a decade or so ago), often studded with single-parent families taking advantage of the comfortable setting and good kids' menu. While your children chow down on pasta, a burrito, grilled cheese, a quesadilla or sliders (each $3.25), you get to gnaw away those divorce-budget blues on a well-priced basket of wings, drowned with a beer or two. And if you're looking for love, Brady Brunch-style, here's the story: Slide that table over next to the single-parent family next to you, and let the kids fight for the fries while you talk 401K plans.
When a divorced parent decides to dine out with the kids, it's important to do so in an atmosphere as comfortable for the little ones as it is for Mom or Dad. At Govnr's Park, a longtime central Denver hangout, the scene is relaxed and casual (unless, that is, you met your future ex- over a big margarita here a decade or so ago), often studded with single-parent families taking advantage of the comfortable setting and good kids' menu. While your children chow down on pasta, a burrito, grilled cheese, a quesadilla or sliders (each $3.25), you get to gnaw away those divorce-budget blues on a well-priced basket of wings, drowned with a beer or two. And if you're looking for love, Brady Brunch-style, here's the story: Slide that table over next to the single-parent family next to you, and let the kids fight for the fries while you talk 401K plans.
Although its sandwiches top any others in town, the TreeHouse Cafe -- a repeat winner in this category -- remains one of Denver's best-kept secrets. Less than seven bucks buys you a sandwich big enough for two, a massive, jam-packed meal made of top-notch meats, cheeses and other fixin's, all piled into your choice of focaccia or baguette, marble rye or wheat. You can assemble your sandwich from a lengthy list of ingredients, or go with one of the TreeHouse's suggested combinations, such as the Cubano: organic eggs scrambled gently and layered with sweet slices of ham, turkey and provolone, with the result looking for all the world like an exploded suitcase. The pizza sandwich is as close as you'll get to a four-inch-thick slice; the Vaggio's Veloute, its breaded chicken topped by Danish ham and Swiss, all smothered in the mother of white gravies, makes the average diner-style open-faced turkey sandwich look like an hors d'oeuvre. Wash your sandwich down with a great milkshake or smoothie. Bonus: These babies are available until midnight every night, which makes the TreeHouse not only an ideal spot for late-night munchies, but also for some entertaining people-watching.

Although its sandwiches top any others in town, the TreeHouse Cafe -- a repeat winner in this category -- remains one of Denver's best-kept secrets. Less than seven bucks buys you a sandwich big enough for two, a massive, jam-packed meal made of top-notch meats, cheeses and other fixin's, all piled into your choice of focaccia or baguette, marble rye or wheat. You can assemble your sandwich from a lengthy list of ingredients, or go with one of the TreeHouse's suggested combinations, such as the Cubano: organic eggs scrambled gently and layered with sweet slices of ham, turkey and provolone, with the result looking for all the world like an exploded suitcase. The pizza sandwich is as close as you'll get to a four-inch-thick slice; the Vaggio's Veloute, its breaded chicken topped by Danish ham and Swiss, all smothered in the mother of white gravies, makes the average diner-style open-faced turkey sandwich look like an hors d'oeuvre. Wash your sandwich down with a great milkshake or smoothie. Bonus: These babies are available until midnight every night, which makes the TreeHouse not only an ideal spot for late-night munchies, but also for some entertaining people-watching.

Although every sandwich shop and cafe thinks it wants to offer panini, what they usually cook up is a far cry from the way these grilled Italian sandwiches are supposed to turn out. For panini done right, head to Panini Grill, a teeny Italian bistro that not only grills a mean panini, but boasts a welcoming attitude and makes good pastas, too. You can create your own panini combo from the list of ten meats, eight cheeses, three pesto spreads and ten other possible ingredients, ordering everything on traditional focaccia or rosemary focaccia (you can also get a non-grilled sandwich on a French roll -- but why would you?). Once your sandwich is assembled, it gets a real grilling in the special panini maker, keeping the fillings moist and the bread chewy. If you're not feeling particularly creative, you can't go wrong with one of the house panini -- the sliced meatballs with Mamma's homemade sauce and provolone is the ultimate meatball sandwich -- paired with a bowl of veggie-packed minestrone. Eat your meal inside, or at one of the tables on the sidewalk; either way, this is the grill of your dreams.

Although every sandwich shop and cafe thinks it wants to offer panini, what they usually cook up is a far cry from the way these grilled Italian sandwiches are supposed to turn out. For panini done right, head to Panini Grill, a teeny Italian bistro that not only grills a mean panini, but boasts a welcoming attitude and makes good pastas, too. You can create your own panini combo from the list of ten meats, eight cheeses, three pesto spreads and ten other possible ingredients, ordering everything on traditional focaccia or rosemary focaccia (you can also get a non-grilled sandwich on a French roll -- but why would you?). Once your sandwich is assembled, it gets a real grilling in the special panini maker, keeping the fillings moist and the bread chewy. If you're not feeling particularly creative, you can't go wrong with one of the house panini -- the sliced meatballs with Mamma's homemade sauce and provolone is the ultimate meatball sandwich -- paired with a bowl of veggie-packed minestrone. Eat your meal inside, or at one of the tables on the sidewalk; either way, this is the grill of your dreams.

Best Of Denver®

Best Of