Visitors to City Park in recent years may have noticed the Box Canyon ruins meandering behind the Denver Museum of Nature and Science and wondered what the heck it was all about. Well, it was once quite something -- designed in 1953 by noted landscape architect S.R. DeBoer, the miniature canyon waterway ambled through the park before emptying into a lily pond and Ferril Lake, evoking the kind of scenery we're used to seeing up in the Rockies. But over the years it fell into disrepair -- until this spring, when volunteers from Denver Urban Gardens and the Garden Club of Denver joined hands with Denver Parks and Recreation to restore the little gorge by solidifying its rock walls, landscaping it with river alders, ginnala maple, river birch, mountain mahogany, squaw currant, apache plume shrub and other native plantings and building two trails. DUG co-director Michael Buchenau deems that unique partnership a success, which bodes well for the future of similar large-scale restoration projects in public places.

Denver's homegrown (now-ex) boxing champ, WBC lightweight title-holder Stevie "Li'l But Bad" Johnston, wasted no time on March 17 reducing his opponent to rubble. Cut over the left eye in the first round, Johnston pelted the gape-jawed challenger, Mexico's Julion Alvarez, with a furious barrage in the second and was soon aloft on the shoulders of his corner men. That meant the 8,000 Johnston fans in Magness Arena -- this was the champ's first Denver fight in four years -- had plenty of time to celebrate the victory over cocktails and relatively early dinners out -- and for the male halves of couples to tell their wives and dates how tough they used to be.
Denver's homegrown (now-ex) boxing champ, WBC lightweight title-holder Stevie "Li'l But Bad" Johnston, wasted no time on March 17 reducing his opponent to rubble. Cut over the left eye in the first round, Johnston pelted the gape-jawed challenger, Mexico's Julion Alvarez, with a furious barrage in the second and was soon aloft on the shoulders of his corner men. That meant the 8,000 Johnston fans in Magness Arena -- this was the champ's first Denver fight in four years -- had plenty of time to celebrate the victory over cocktails and relatively early dinners out -- and for the male halves of couples to tell their wives and dates how tough they used to be.
Women's Quest's motto is a quote by Helen Keller: "Life is either a daring adventure or nothing at all" -- and that's pretty much the point of these rejuvenating multi-sport retreats for women of all skill levels and ages organized by Boulderite Colleen Cannon, a leading female triathlete in the '80s and still a mighty tough cookie. Kind of a support group in fitness wear, a Women's Quest adventure is designed to be a working vacation for every part of your body, as well as your mind and spirit. Go, girls!
Women's Quest's motto is a quote by Helen Keller: "Life is either a daring adventure or nothing at all" -- and that's pretty much the point of these rejuvenating multi-sport retreats for women of all skill levels and ages organized by Boulderite Colleen Cannon, a leading female triathlete in the '80s and still a mighty tough cookie. Kind of a support group in fitness wear, a Women's Quest adventure is designed to be a working vacation for every part of your body, as well as your mind and spirit. Go, girls!
Red & Jerry's is a cozy little nook containing fourteen pool tables, two huge bars, several acres of explosive video games and enough dining tables to seat the U.S. Marine Corps. It is also the best public off-track betting establishment in the state -- mostly because the food and drink are so good. Start your exacta off with a big burger, great fish and chips, a nice rack of ribs or a sublime club sandwich. Four bucks buys you a closed-circuit TV monitor right there at your table. So even if your nine-to-one shot gives it up in the stretch at Gulfstream, at least you'll have the comforts of a good meal.
Red & Jerry's is a cozy little nook containing fourteen pool tables, two huge bars, several acres of explosive video games and enough dining tables to seat the U.S. Marine Corps. It is also the best public off-track betting establishment in the state -- mostly because the food and drink are so good. Start your exacta off with a big burger, great fish and chips, a nice rack of ribs or a sublime club sandwich. Four bucks buys you a closed-circuit TV monitor right there at your table. So even if your nine-to-one shot gives it up in the stretch at Gulfstream, at least you'll have the comforts of a good meal.
The top-ranked Karen Legg Kennel has produced many champions, but few are as thrilling to watch as Shootyz Groove, a two-and-a-half-year-old sprinter with a dazzling burst of early speed. In the winter meet at Wembley Park (aka Mile High Kennel Club), Groove hit the wire first in fourteen of his twenty-three starts, including the Winter Sprint Championship, and he won seventeen of 21 this spring at Cloverleaf, in Loveland. Upon returning to the Big Store June 9, the brindle son of P's Raising Cain out of MJ's Shadow promptly won the Inaugural by more than seven lengths. His next big test will come July 8, when he'll likely go off as the favorite in the Colorado Classic.
The top-ranked Karen Legg Kennel has produced many champions, but few are as thrilling to watch as Shootyz Groove, a two-and-a-half-year-old sprinter with a dazzling burst of early speed. In the winter meet at Wembley Park (aka Mile High Kennel Club), Groove hit the wire first in fourteen of his twenty-three starts, including the Winter Sprint Championship, and he won seventeen of 21 this spring at Cloverleaf, in Loveland. Upon returning to the Big Store June 9, the brindle son of P's Raising Cain out of MJ's Shadow promptly won the Inaugural by more than seven lengths. His next big test will come July 8, when he'll likely go off as the favorite in the Colorado Classic.
Tangaray Farms' promising Colorado-bred, Moonlight Maverick, has done almost everything right since he began racing last year. As a two-year-old, he won the $100,000 Gold Rush Futurity at Arapahoe Park, then kicked off his three-year-old campaign June 3 with a win in the six-furlong Inaugural, under rider Don Frazier. In six career starts, the dark bay son of Seattle Sleet and Hempen Cutie has won five times and finished second once, earning more than $95,000. Trainer Ken Gleason means to keep him on the grounds at Arapahoe, so fellow sprinters better look out. Alas, the Mav is a gelding, so he's likely to do more racing than dating in future seasons.

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