The most captivating thing about this new park along the South Platte River is that it doesn't disguise what it used to be: a sewage-treatment plant. Instead of tearing down all the ponds and sluices that had been used to treat Denver's waste, the park's designers opted to save some money by simply filling them in, leaving an intriguing patchwork of concrete walls and steps that blend right in. What was once the edge of a sewage tank is now a place to sit and have a picnic, and rows of trees fill up former filtration ponds. Immediately to the west of the park is the Heron Pond Natural Area, a wetland teeming with wildlife that somehow managed to survive in the midst of a heavily industrialized district. This park has given the long-neglected Globeville neighborhood a new jewel and turned an eyesore into a green space that still honors the industrial legacy of the site.
The most captivating thing about this new park along the South Platte River is that it doesn't disguise what it used to be: a sewage-treatment plant. Instead of tearing down all the ponds and sluices that had been used to treat Denver's waste, the park's designers opted to save some money by simply filling them in, leaving an intriguing patchwork of concrete walls and steps that blend right in. What was once the edge of a sewage tank is now a place to sit and have a picnic, and rows of trees fill up former filtration ponds. Immediately to the west of the park is the Heron Pond Natural Area, a wetland teeming with wildlife that somehow managed to survive in the midst of a heavily industrialized district. This park has given the long-neglected Globeville neighborhood a new jewel and turned an eyesore into a green space that still honors the industrial legacy of the site.
In a city with its share of things that smell bad -- the Purina facility, the stock show grounds and the police department, to name a few -- it's a welcome relief every so often to sniff something sweet. To that end, when the wind is just right, the Jolly Rancher plant gives off the tantalizing scents of grape, apple, watermelon and other fruity fragrances that fold down out of Wheat Ridge and settle in northwest Denver. The company, which was founded in Colorado in 1942 by Bill and Dorothy Harmsen, is now owned by Hershey. It produces fifteen million pieces of candy a day. Just call it aromatherapy that doesn't suck!
In a city with its share of things that smell bad -- the Purina facility, the stock show grounds and the police department, to name a few -- it's a welcome relief every so often to sniff something sweet. To that end, when the wind is just right, the Jolly Rancher plant gives off the tantalizing scents of grape, apple, watermelon and other fruity fragrances that fold down out of Wheat Ridge and settle in northwest Denver. The company, which was founded in Colorado in 1942 by Bill and Dorothy Harmsen, is now owned by Hershey. It produces fifteen million pieces of candy a day. Just call it aromatherapy that doesn't suck!

Readers' choice: 2001

Readers' choice: 2001

This year, the FBI released the 33-page file it had compiled on John Denver, which included reports of death threats made to the entertainer, as well as references to possible drug use. "It was alleged Denver was pretty well strung out on cocaine," said one entry linking the Mafia with a benefit concert that Denver had headlined in Colorado. Far out!

This year, the FBI released the 33-page file it had compiled on John Denver, which included reports of death threats made to the entertainer, as well as references to possible drug use. "It was alleged Denver was pretty well strung out on cocaine," said one entry linking the Mafia with a benefit concert that Denver had headlined in Colorado. Far out!

Since the opening of Denver International Airport, which he considered a boondoggle, Amole, the veteran columnist for the Rocky Mountain News, has spent much of his time penning nostalgic offerings for the over-eighty set. But just prior to the first day of school at Columbine High School following the shootings there the previous April, Amole got back to current events with a vengeance. His piece, "Let Columbine Open Media-Free," was practically the only call for restraint in the coverage of that event, and it rang even truer because of its appearance on the same page as a couple of articles that exemplified the exploitation he decried. Welcome back to today, Gene. Hope you stick around for a while.

Since the opening of Denver International Airport, which he considered a boondoggle, Amole, the veteran columnist for the Rocky Mountain News, has spent much of his time penning nostalgic offerings for the over-eighty set. But just prior to the first day of school at Columbine High School following the shootings there the previous April, Amole got back to current events with a vengeance. His piece, "Let Columbine Open Media-Free," was practically the only call for restraint in the coverage of that event, and it rang even truer because of its appearance on the same page as a couple of articles that exemplified the exploitation he decried. Welcome back to today, Gene. Hope you stick around for a while.

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