Best place to see local TV reporters pretending to be local TV reporters

Perfect Murder, Perfect Town by Lawrence Schiller

The TV mini-series version of author Lawrence Schiller's JonBenét Ramsey opus, Perfect Murder, Perfect Town, featured numerous area reporters, including Brian Maass and Raj Chohan, portraying themselves -- and not once did any of them seem shocked that stooped, bald Colorado Springs investigator Lou Smit was personified by tall, hirsute Kris Kristofferson. Credibility be damned: Give us more face time!

Best place to see local TV reporters pretending to be local TV reporters

Perfect Murder, Perfect Town by Lawrence Schiller

The TV mini-series version of author Lawrence Schiller's JonBenét Ramsey opus, Perfect Murder, Perfect Town, featured numerous area reporters, including Brian Maass and Raj Chohan, portraying themselves -- and not once did any of them seem shocked that stooped, bald Colorado Springs investigator Lou Smit was personified by tall, hirsute Kris Kristofferson. Credibility be damned: Give us more face time!

Most radio programmers believe that the fastest route to big ratings is to ratchet up the obnoxiousness factor -- and more often than not, they're right. But KBCO's Bret Saunders is the exception to this rule. He's become one of the most-listened-to personalities on the air by rejecting the usual snickering tag-team byplay in favor of a format that blends good conversation with humor that dares to be smart. Wouldn't it be nice if this became a trend?
Most radio programmers believe that the fastest route to big ratings is to ratchet up the obnoxiousness factor -- and more often than not, they're right. But KBCO's Bret Saunders is the exception to this rule. He's become one of the most-listened-to personalities on the air by rejecting the usual snickering tag-team byplay in favor of a format that blends good conversation with humor that dares to be smart. Wouldn't it be nice if this became a trend?
Pleasures don't get much guiltier than this -- but who's complaining? Although The Sports Zoo can seem downright stupid at times, the unmistakable chemistry between Dave Logan, Scott Hastings and Susie Wargin generally leaves drivers with smiles on their faces. And when you're stuck on I-25 at 5 o'clock on Friday afternoon, a smile can be a mighty powerful thing.
Pleasures don't get much guiltier than this -- but who's complaining? Although The Sports Zoo can seem downright stupid at times, the unmistakable chemistry between Dave Logan, Scott Hastings and Susie Wargin generally leaves drivers with smiles on their faces. And when you're stuck on I-25 at 5 o'clock on Friday afternoon, a smile can be a mighty powerful thing.
His hey-dude antics have been an evening staple on KBPI for years -- so when the station's morning show, The Lockerroom, appeared on the verge of cratering (again!), no one was surprised that Willie B. was asked to save the day. What was unexpected, though, was his decision to work days and nights simultaneously; he spends Monday through Friday mornings from 5:30 to 10 a.m. in the company of cohorts Marc Stout and D-Mak (Darren McKee), then returns from 7 to 10 p.m. for a solo stint. Hook that man up to a caffeine IV.
His hey-dude antics have been an evening staple on KBPI for years -- so when the station's morning show, The Lockerroom, appeared on the verge of cratering (again!), no one was surprised that Willie B. was asked to save the day. What was unexpected, though, was his decision to work days and nights simultaneously; he spends Monday through Friday mornings from 5:30 to 10 a.m. in the company of cohorts Marc Stout and D-Mak (Darren McKee), then returns from 7 to 10 p.m. for a solo stint. Hook that man up to a caffeine IV.
Good a.m. television is a matter of balance: It should be bright and sunny enough to motivate viewers out the door, but not so gabby and giddy that folks will be looking for kittens to run over the second they slip behind the wheel. Channel 9 doesn't always turn this trick; that damn you-made-it-through-the-week song they play every Friday under a montage of wacky anchor antics is a threat to the entire Front Range pussycat population. But main man Gary Shapiro, weather trivialist Ed Greene, business boy Gregg Moss and follicle innovator Kyle Dyer are good company who, on most mornings, mix lighthearted insignificance and actual news in just the right proportions.

Readers' choice: Channel 9

Good a.m. television is a matter of balance: It should be bright and sunny enough to motivate viewers out the door, but not so gabby and giddy that folks will be looking for kittens to run over the second they slip behind the wheel. Channel 9 doesn't always turn this trick; that damn you-made-it-through-the-week song they play every Friday under a montage of wacky anchor antics is a threat to the entire Front Range pussycat population. But main man Gary Shapiro, weather trivialist Ed Greene, business boy Gregg Moss and follicle innovator Kyle Dyer are good company who, on most mornings, mix lighthearted insignificance and actual news in just the right proportions.

Readers' choice: Channel 9

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