Don't get us wrong: We're as sick as you are of Shagman (both the original and his replacement and the original who's back again), Audra, Officer O'Dell and the whole Rocky's Autos commercial crew, including those Detroit hitmen who took forever to get to Denver in this winter's tedious series. That's why Rocky's holiday commercial, which consisted of thirty seconds of a babbling brook and a simple written greeting from Rocky's Autos, came as such a welcome, blessed relief. (A confession: We're also partial to the current Rocky's Autos ad that stars former Westword scribe John Ashton as an attorney who puts Shagman on trial.)

For those Denverites who are vigilant about land use and transportation planning, lutac.org is the place to vent about everything from traffic to zoning to affordable housing. The site, which was created by Brian Brainerd and is hosted by the Upper Larimer Neighborhood Association, encourages public dialogue -- polite, please -- about the city's Land Use and Transportation Plan (currently under development, and set for release this spring) as well as other hot topics; postings include letters, comments, documents and downright rants from the neighborhood. It's the 21st-century equivalent of the town crier. While talk is cheap, Web postings can be very valuable to the public discourse.
For those Denverites who are vigilant about land use and transportation planning, lutac.org is the place to vent about everything from traffic to zoning to affordable housing. The site, which was created by Brian Brainerd and is hosted by the Upper Larimer Neighborhood Association, encourages public dialogue -- polite, please -- about the city's Land Use and Transportation Plan (currently under development, and set for release this spring) as well as other hot topics; postings include letters, comments, documents and downright rants from the neighborhood. It's the 21st-century equivalent of the town crier. While talk is cheap, Web postings can be very valuable to the public discourse.
Best hair. And best cheekbones. And best eyes. And best wardrobe. And -- well, you get the picture. Libby Weaver is so astoundingly telegenic that it's a wonder the other anchors in town haven't hired Tonya Harding to make sure at least one part of her anatomy looks less than perfect.
Best hair. And best cheekbones. And best eyes. And best wardrobe. And -- well, you get the picture. Libby Weaver is so astoundingly telegenic that it's a wonder the other anchors in town haven't hired Tonya Harding to make sure at least one part of her anatomy looks less than perfect.
Even when KMGH anchor Sean McLaughlin is delivering the latest headlines, his extremely prominent smackers -- which look like the result of several hundred successful collagen treatments -- seem ready for a smooch. Pucker up.

Even when KMGH anchor Sean McLaughlin is delivering the latest headlines, his extremely prominent smackers -- which look like the result of several hundred successful collagen treatments -- seem ready for a smooch. Pucker up.

Best Performance by a TV Anchor in a Tough Spot

Jim Benemann, Channel 9

The ratings at Channel 9 have dipped since the departures of longtimers Ed Sardella and Ron Zappolo, but the station's ten o'clock newscast remains the area's most most popular -- and Jim Benemann is a big reason why. Sardella left big shoes to fill, but Benemann slipped into them quite comfortably. He's not flashy, just companionable and extremely watchable.

Best Performance by a TV Anchor in a Tough Spot

Jim Benemann, Channel 9

The ratings at Channel 9 have dipped since the departures of longtimers Ed Sardella and Ron Zappolo, but the station's ten o'clock newscast remains the area's most most popular -- and Jim Benemann is a big reason why. Sardella left big shoes to fill, but Benemann slipped into them quite comfortably. He's not flashy, just companionable and extremely watchable.

Best Alternative Nickname for 'Convergence Corridor'

Pink-Slip Prairie

It seemed like such a good idea six months and 2,000 stock-market points ago: Give the cities along the Front Range one marketable identity that would give Silicon Valley a run for its money. But since the fall of 2000, that money has disappeared faster than your average Denver worker at 4 p.m. on a Friday, and today the entire Convergence Corridor looks like one big booster boondoggle. Better to pay a local advertising company a boatload -- and the boosters did -- to promote our high-altitude fun than to market our high-tech potential. As another area that's been Silicon-jobbed might warn of catering to the wrong companies: Boeing, Boeing, gone!

Best Of Denver®

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