Best Place to Snag a Foul Ball at Coors Field

First baseline

When you're sitting in sections 151-156 in left field, the combination of batting practice and Rox bombs can make it seem like a target range. But those who know the meaning of "some lucky fan just got dinged" sit in sections 119-116 and those nearby, where Larry Walker's liners often land. And while other parts of the stadium may get peppered from time to time, the patient Walker is known to foul off, oh, about eight in a row when he's feeling picky. And that makes for free horsehides -- although some of those scorchers can make a fan think twice about shooting up a hand for a grab.

Under the watchful direction of coaches Tim Frye and Cheri Steffes, Gymnastics Plus offers a full array of instruction for all levels of Olympic wannabes. They also believe in starting 'em young, whether it's just for fun or in anticipation of a future in the gymnastics spotlight. Beginning with a parent-tot program for kids ages eighteen months to three years, tiny tumblers at GP learn to limber up on mats, trampolines and tiny balance beams, running through child-friendly routines with help from an adult, and using equipment both in the main gym facility and in the specially sized Little Gym. Those showing an affinity can forge ahead to more advanced preschool programs as they grow more independent, but no matter what the level, the little gymnasts leave each week with a good workout, rosy cheeks and a feeling of accomplishment.
Under the watchful direction of coaches Tim Frye and Cheri Steffes, Gymnastics Plus offers a full array of instruction for all levels of Olympic wannabes. They also believe in starting 'em young, whether it's just for fun or in anticipation of a future in the gymnastics spotlight. Beginning with a parent-tot program for kids ages eighteen months to three years, tiny tumblers at GP learn to limber up on mats, trampolines and tiny balance beams, running through child-friendly routines with help from an adult, and using equipment both in the main gym facility and in the specially sized Little Gym. Those showing an affinity can forge ahead to more advanced preschool programs as they grow more independent, but no matter what the level, the little gymnasts leave each week with a good workout, rosy cheeks and a feeling of accomplishment.
The Pioneers had been there before, but this was something special. On March 10 in Middlebury, Vermont, the University of Denver ski team won the NCAA championships for the second straight year -- and for a record sixteenth time in school history. A perennial power on snow (particularly in the grueling men's Nordic events), DU easily outpointed second-place Vermont and third-place Colorado by winning three events overall, scoring two individual victories and putting eleven All-American performances by seven skiers in the books. In the tough ten-kilometer men's race, DU skiers Wolf Wallendorf, Joern Frohs and Pietro Broggini swept the top three places. The Pioneers last claimed back-to-back NCAA titles in 1970 and 1971.
The Pioneers had been there before, but this was something special. On March 10 in Middlebury, Vermont, the University of Denver ski team won the NCAA championships for the second straight year -- and for a record sixteenth time in school history. A perennial power on snow (particularly in the grueling men's Nordic events), DU easily outpointed second-place Vermont and third-place Colorado by winning three events overall, scoring two individual victories and putting eleven All-American performances by seven skiers in the books. In the tough ten-kilometer men's race, DU skiers Wolf Wallendorf, Joern Frohs and Pietro Broggini swept the top three places. The Pioneers last claimed back-to-back NCAA titles in 1970 and 1971.
Not long ago, there was little doubt about which sport ruled and who was its golden king. But John Elway has gone, and the mighty Broncos have scuffled. Still, there's pigskin promise. Bob Griese's kid Brian -- going into his fourth season as a pro -- has developed the strength, savvy and leadership skills to lead the Broncos out of their two-year funk, but his durability remains the big question. When not riding the pine in 2000, Griese played hurt, sometimes heroically. But if he has to do it again, a pall may quickly fall on the big Invesco Field (IF) at Mile High. A healthy Terrell Davis in the backfield would vastly improve the value of Griese's stock -- and the team's.
Not long ago, there was little doubt about which sport ruled and who was its golden king. But John Elway has gone, and the mighty Broncos have scuffled. Still, there's pigskin promise. Bob Griese's kid Brian -- going into his fourth season as a pro -- has developed the strength, savvy and leadership skills to lead the Broncos out of their two-year funk, but his durability remains the big question. When not riding the pine in 2000, Griese played hurt, sometimes heroically. But if he has to do it again, a pall may quickly fall on the big Invesco Field (IF) at Mile High. A healthy Terrell Davis in the backfield would vastly improve the value of Griese's stock -- and the team's.
Some argue that college sports have become little more than the minor leagues for the pros, and with the hype surrounding most Division I sports, it's hard to argue. But sometimes the "old college try" still involves more than the bottom line. Such is the case with Sonny Lubick. Many big-name college football programs would love to woo Lubick away from Fort Collins, but CSU football's savior is staying put. When the Butte, Montana, native took over the Rams seven years ago, they had managed just nine winning seasons and one bowl appearance in 34 years. Since 1993, they've won 49 games and three conference titles, played in three Holiday Bowls and been nationally ranked four times. Last season, Lubick's charges went 10-2, beat Louisville in the Liberty Bowl and finished the year ranked number fourteen by Associated Press. Next up for Coach Sonny? Rival CU at the big IF on September 1.
Some argue that college sports have become little more than the minor leagues for the pros, and with the hype surrounding most Division I sports, it's hard to argue. But sometimes the "old college try" still involves more than the bottom line. Such is the case with Sonny Lubick. Many big-name college football programs would love to woo Lubick away from Fort Collins, but CSU football's savior is staying put. When the Butte, Montana, native took over the Rams seven years ago, they had managed just nine winning seasons and one bowl appearance in 34 years. Since 1993, they've won 49 games and three conference titles, played in three Holiday Bowls and been nationally ranked four times. Last season, Lubick's charges went 10-2, beat Louisville in the Liberty Bowl and finished the year ranked number fourteen by Associated Press. Next up for Coach Sonny? Rival CU at the big IF on September 1.
You may have seen some of them at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, or maybe at the Smithsonian, but only in Wray, on the southern edge of the Sand Hills near the Nebraska border, can you see where these 10,000-year-old bison bones came from. They were originally unearthed in 1972 when a local rancher was digging an irrigation ditch; the Smithsonian later excavated the site, which yielded more than 41,000 bones, 248 stone artifacts and thousands of remains of smaller animals. As thanks for the town's contribution to adding to this treasure trove of science, the museum set up a permanent exhibit in Wray, complete with a few precious bison bones.

Best Of Denver®

Best Of