Best Locally Owned Racehorse That Flies

Reraise

We are not talking $5,000 claimers here -- the manes-and-tails that run at Arapahoe Park. Reraise, majority-owned by Denver rock promoter (and longtime student of the breed) Barry Fey, is what racetrack people call a "freak" -- an animal that regularly runs faster than anyone thinks possible. In November 1998, Reraise beat the best sprinters in the world in the top-of-the-line Breeders Cup Sprint at Churchill Downs and won the prestigious Eclipse Award for sprinter of the year. Despite a long convalescence from minor injuries, which could make for an uncertain 2001 schedule, the speedster is still considered one of the top ten turf sprinters. Giddyap.

Skinner Middle School
Meteorologists are made, not born. Seventh-graders at Skinner get the chance to not only give morning weather reports but also do serious scientific data gathering, thanks to the state-of-the-art weather station on the roof of the school. One of only six in the country donated by Canadian climatologist Reese Halter, founder of Global Forest, the weather station monitors everything from rainfall and snowfall accumulations to ultraviolet radiation and heat stress. The students download the data weekly and transfer it to Global Forest's site, where it's analyzed by scientists at the University of Victoria in British Columbia. The forecast is sunny.

Meteorologists are made, not born. Seventh-graders at Skinner get the chance to not only give morning weather reports but also do serious scientific data gathering, thanks to the state-of-the-art weather station on the roof of the school. One of only six in the country donated by Canadian climatologist Reese Halter, founder of Global Forest, the weather station monitors everything from rainfall and snowfall accumulations to ultraviolet radiation and heat stress. The students download the data weekly and transfer it to Global Forest's site, where it's analyzed by scientists at the University of Victoria in British Columbia. The forecast is sunny.

Colorado ski areas present an embarrassment of riches for the downhill crowd, but a mind-bending, knee-breaking bump run at Arapahoe Basin called Pallavicini deserves special mention. Named for an Austrian nobleman who was also a skiing pioneer, it's a broad field of daunting moguls piled up on a forty-degree pitch for more than a quarter mile -- a challenge that only the most daring hotdoggers take up. Reach the bottom in one piece, and you've quite a story to tell. Fair warning: No skier over 35 need apply.

Colorado ski areas present an embarrassment of riches for the downhill crowd, but a mind-bending, knee-breaking bump run at Arapahoe Basin called Pallavicini deserves special mention. Named for an Austrian nobleman who was also a skiing pioneer, it's a broad field of daunting moguls piled up on a forty-degree pitch for more than a quarter mile -- a challenge that only the most daring hotdoggers take up. Reach the bottom in one piece, and you've quite a story to tell. Fair warning: No skier over 35 need apply.

Sure, we all love skiing and boarding the Rockies. It's the expense that gets us down -- fuel, lift tickets, parking, lunch, equipment rental and so on. Thankfully, Copper Mountain eased the pain this season: It offered four full-day lift tickets (with only a handful of blackout days) for a measly $49, which is what you generally pay for one ticket. The "pass" was actually a credit card that you could slip into your wallet or purse, and it was good for the entire season. (Copper also offered a quartet of spring-skiing lift tickets at half the price.) The popular passes sold out faster than it takes to blaze a black-diamond run, so we hope Copper gives us a repeat performance next season.
Sure, we all love skiing and boarding the Rockies. It's the expense that gets us down -- fuel, lift tickets, parking, lunch, equipment rental and so on. Thankfully, Copper Mountain eased the pain this season: It offered four full-day lift tickets (with only a handful of blackout days) for a measly $49, which is what you generally pay for one ticket. The "pass" was actually a credit card that you could slip into your wallet or purse, and it was good for the entire season. (Copper also offered a quartet of spring-skiing lift tickets at half the price.) The popular passes sold out faster than it takes to blaze a black-diamond run, so we hope Copper gives us a repeat performance next season.
Created by the communications group at the National Snow and Ice Data Center at the University of Colorado at Boulder, this award-winning site leads users through the life of a glacier via rare archival photos. The site contains everything anyone would ever want to know about glaciers, plus some pretty cool links to related sites.

Created by the communications group at the National Snow and Ice Data Center at the University of Colorado at Boulder, this award-winning site leads users through the life of a glacier via rare archival photos. The site contains everything anyone would ever want to know about glaciers, plus some pretty cool links to related sites.

No one can accuse ranger David Jamiel of not making the most of his assignment at Two Ponds National Wildlife Refuge -- a 73-acre Arvada "sub-unit" of the Rocky Mountain Arsenal. Jamiel has attracted almost seventy volunteers and 6,000 visits to the prairie paradise, an accomplishment that recently earned him top billing as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Refuge Employee of the Year -- besting 7,500 employees at more than 530 refuges nationwide. On his tours, Jamiel likes to point out the 100 species of birds, wildlife such as deer, fox and coyotes, as well as assorted creatures that dwell in the three ponds at Two Ponds. And since this offshoot is miles from the arsenal proper, chances are good that visitors won't be stumbling over any unexploded sarin bombs.

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