Technically, the downstairs restrooms in the century-old Oxford Hotel are not intended for the public -- but they're just too lovely not to share with the world. Although the smaller bathrooms that you reach through McCormick's Fish House are nice enough, the real winners are below the hotel lobby. And while the women's bathroom is spacious, well-stocked and boasts acres of vintage Victorian tile, the men's room can claim magnificent marble urinals -- the very vessels that Bat Masterson is rumored to have emptied his, er, weapon into. To pee or not to pee? That's no question when you're in the vicinity of the Oxford. Just walk in like you own the place, head downstairs and have a seat.

On World AIDS Day last December, the Denver Health and Hospitals Authority began posting messages in public restrooms around town that promoted male and female condoms -- conveniently available through DHHA. The campaign, called Prevention Option for Women: Equal Rights (POWER), was aimed at young women at risk for HIV/AIDS, other sexually transmitted diseases and unplanned pregnancies. "Minds have a tendency to open up behind closed doors," said campaign spokeswoman Sheana Bull, "and ironically public restrooms offer a very unique private environment."
On World AIDS Day last December, the Denver Health and Hospitals Authority began posting messages in public restrooms around town that promoted male and female condoms -- conveniently available through DHHA. The campaign, called Prevention Option for Women: Equal Rights (POWER), was aimed at young women at risk for HIV/AIDS, other sexually transmitted diseases and unplanned pregnancies. "Minds have a tendency to open up behind closed doors," said campaign spokeswoman Sheana Bull, "and ironically public restrooms offer a very unique private environment."
If you want to see how Denver transformed itself from a high-plains cactus patch into the West's leading cowtown, grab a bicycle and head for the South Platte River trail. Start at Chatfield Dam, built after the devastating flood of 1965, which created a crucial water source for the metro area. Heading north toward downtown, you'll pass acres of suburban bluegrass lawns soaking up enough of that water to float a cruise ship. Make a pit stop at Colorado's Ocean Journey, where you can witness an even more extravagant use of water to support sharks, tigers and assorted other creatures that were never meant to live here. Finally, just over the Adams County line, you'll come to the Metro Wastewater treatment plan, where a frothy waterfall cascades into the river and the abuse of the South Platte reaches a smelly finale. Bottoms up!
If you want to see how Denver transformed itself from a high-plains cactus patch into the West's leading cowtown, grab a bicycle and head for the South Platte River trail. Start at Chatfield Dam, built after the devastating flood of 1965, which created a crucial water source for the metro area. Heading north toward downtown, you'll pass acres of suburban bluegrass lawns soaking up enough of that water to float a cruise ship. Make a pit stop at Colorado's Ocean Journey, where you can witness an even more extravagant use of water to support sharks, tigers and assorted other creatures that were never meant to live here. Finally, just over the Adams County line, you'll come to the Metro Wastewater treatment plan, where a frothy waterfall cascades into the river and the abuse of the South Platte reaches a smelly finale. Bottoms up!
Denver mayor Wellington Webb has deftly navigated one crisis after another over the past year, and Andrew Hudson, his public mouthpiece, is a big part of the reason why. He's Denver's most effective spin doctor, and the source of more news in this city than most journalists would care to admit.
Denver mayor Wellington Webb has deftly navigated one crisis after another over the past year, and Andrew Hudson, his public mouthpiece, is a big part of the reason why. He's Denver's most effective spin doctor, and the source of more news in this city than most journalists would care to admit.
When they needed a model American town for Main Street, USA, Disneyland's designers looked to Old Town in Fort Collins. But Disney was willing to return the favor, in the form of the Big Cowboy who's stood over Federal Boulevard for almost fifty years. In 1955, sculptor John Sutton, who'd done much of the early work at Disneyland, stopped off in Colorado and created the giant fiberglass cowboy guarding the Rustic Ranch trailer park (as well as a frog in Rocky Mountain Park) before moving on to even greater works at the Bronx Zoo. Ride 'em, cowboy.

When they needed a model American town for Main Street, USA, Disneyland's designers looked to Old Town in Fort Collins. But Disney was willing to return the favor, in the form of the Big Cowboy who's stood over Federal Boulevard for almost fifty years. In 1955, sculptor John Sutton, who'd done much of the early work at Disneyland, stopped off in Colorado and created the giant fiberglass cowboy guarding the Rustic Ranch trailer park (as well as a frog in Rocky Mountain Park) before moving on to even greater works at the Bronx Zoo. Ride 'em, cowboy.

Don't get us wrong: We're as sick as you are of Shagman (both the original and his replacement and the original who's back again), Audra, Officer O'Dell and the whole Rocky's Autos commercial crew, including those Detroit hitmen who took forever to get to Denver in this winter's tedious series. That's why Rocky's holiday commercial, which consisted of thirty seconds of a babbling brook and a simple written greeting from Rocky's Autos, came as such a welcome, blessed relief. (A confession: We're also partial to the current Rocky's Autos ad that stars former Westword scribe John Ashton as an attorney who puts Shagman on trial.)

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