Steele Elementary School
Once upon a time, Room 103 of Denver's Steele Elementary School was just another classroom -- then it became a shining example of educational enterprise. First, in 1983, someone hung a dome from the ceiling and added a projector to throw changing images of the night sky across it. Then, in 1989, fifth-grade teacher Ralph Sodano officially became Denver Public Schools' resident astronomy educator. Today he gives two or three shows a day to more than 6,000 children annually. The shows, presented during the school year, and only by appointment, are always free, even to groups from outside DPS. Sodano organizes his displays for the appropriate age and education level; otherwise, the sky's the limit. Steele's a star!
Once upon a time, Room 103 of Denver's Steele Elementary School was just another classroom -- then it became a shining example of educational enterprise. First, in 1983, someone hung a dome from the ceiling and added a projector to throw changing images of the night sky across it. Then, in 1989, fifth-grade teacher Ralph Sodano officially became Denver Public Schools' resident astronomy educator. Today he gives two or three shows a day to more than 6,000 children annually. The shows, presented during the school year, and only by appointment, are always free, even to groups from outside DPS. Sodano organizes his displays for the appropriate age and education level; otherwise, the sky's the limit. Steele's a star!
While the pot o' Super Bowl gold has eluded him recently, Broncos coach Mike Shanahan felt at home as grand marshal of this year's St. Patrick's Day parade in Denver. Although parade organizers make a point about it being the "second largest" such event in the U.S., it's doubtful that Shanahan would stand pat, so to speak, with that. He was probably scanning the waiver wires afterward, scouting out a few first-round bagpipers and some beefy leprechauns to bring this parade to the top.
While the pot o' Super Bowl gold has eluded him recently, Broncos coach Mike Shanahan felt at home as grand marshal of this year's St. Patrick's Day parade in Denver. Although parade organizers make a point about it being the "second largest" such event in the U.S., it's doubtful that Shanahan would stand pat, so to speak, with that. He was probably scanning the waiver wires afterward, scouting out a few first-round bagpipers and some beefy leprechauns to bring this parade to the top.
Even within the circle of Colorado's intensely competitive kids' soccer leagues, the Lakewood-based Rush teams stand out as almost unwholesomely dominant. This past season, boys and girls playing for the club nearly made a clean sweep of the state tournaments, winning fifteen of the eighteen age-group competitions. The Rush rules!
Even within the circle of Colorado's intensely competitive kids' soccer leagues, the Lakewood-based Rush teams stand out as almost unwholesomely dominant. This past season, boys and girls playing for the club nearly made a clean sweep of the state tournaments, winning fifteen of the eighteen age-group competitions. The Rush rules!
By belting out a roar at halftime during the Broncos-Patriots skirmish, the vein-popping fiends, er, fans at Mile High bested the previous Guinness world record for loudest stadium roar. Their combined efforts, which measured 128.7 decibels, drowned out the previous record set in 1998 at an Irish rugby match. The din equaled the rumble of a jumbo jet, according to officials. Perhaps the only way to top it would be to suit up Mr. Elway -- and, of course, try again in a new stadium that's reportedly capable of sounding twice as loud.

By belting out a roar at halftime during the Broncos-Patriots skirmish, the vein-popping fiends, er, fans at Mile High bested the previous Guinness world record for loudest stadium roar. Their combined efforts, which measured 128.7 decibels, drowned out the previous record set in 1998 at an Irish rugby match. The din equaled the rumble of a jumbo jet, according to officials. Perhaps the only way to top it would be to suit up Mr. Elway -- and, of course, try again in a new stadium that's reportedly capable of sounding twice as loud.

Tired of paying more for LoDo parking than you did for Rockies tickets? Pull into the fifty-space lot tucked into the intersection of 22nd and Stout streets, and you'll feel a little more energized. A mere six blocks from Coors Field and only $3, it's loads cheaper than many of the spots located a few blocks closer, and the money goes to a good cause: the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless, which owns the lot. As part of a program called Stout Street Works!, which encourages the homeless to work for money, self-esteem and a sense of community, the lot is staffed during night and weekend games by two or three workers, who are later paid with the money they collect. "It worked out so well, and the people who worked it were so happy with it," says coalition boardmember Eileen Pappas. "It was easy and outdoors, and they felt like they were a part of something fun."

Tired of paying more for LoDo parking than you did for Rockies tickets? Pull into the fifty-space lot tucked into the intersection of 22nd and Stout streets, and you'll feel a little more energized. A mere six blocks from Coors Field and only $3, it's loads cheaper than many of the spots located a few blocks closer, and the money goes to a good cause: the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless, which owns the lot. As part of a program called Stout Street Works!, which encourages the homeless to work for money, self-esteem and a sense of community, the lot is staffed during night and weekend games by two or three workers, who are later paid with the money they collect. "It worked out so well, and the people who worked it were so happy with it," says coalition boardmember Eileen Pappas. "It was easy and outdoors, and they felt like they were a part of something fun."

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